Home » General » Security Council Toughens Sanctions Against Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Unanimously Adopting Resolution 2371 (2017)

The Security Council today further strengthened its sanctions regime against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, condemning in the strongest terms that country’s ballistic missile launches and reaffirming its decision that Pyongyang shall abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programmes in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner.

Unanimously adopting resolution 2371 (2017) under Article 41, Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the 15-nation Council decided that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea shall not supply, sell or transfer coal, iron, iron ore, seafood, lead and lead ore to other countries.

Expressing concern that Democratic People’s Republic of Korea nationals working abroad were generating foreign export earnings to support the country’s nuclear and ballistic missile programmes, it also decided that all Member States shall not increase the total number of work authorizations for such persons in their jurisdictions, unless approved by the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1718 (2006).

Through the text, the Council decided that States shall prohibit the opening of new joint ventures or cooperative entities with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea entities and individuals, or expand existing joint ventures through additional investments.  In addition, it decided that Pyongyang shall not deploy or use chemical weapons and urgently called for it to accede to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and Their Destruction.

Also through the resolution, the Council named nine individuals and four entities to be subject to a travel ban and asset freeze already in place, as well as to request that the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) issue special notices with respect to designated individuals.

In addition, it reaffirmed that its provisions were not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and that the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1718 (2006), on a case-by-case basis, exempt from sanctions those activities that would facilitate the work of international and non‑governmental organizations engaged in assistance and relief activities for civilian benefit.

Furthermore, through the text, the Council called for the resumption of the Six-Party Talks between China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation and the United States towards the goal of a verifiable and peaceful denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

Speaking after the resolution’s adoption, the representative of the United States said the Council had put the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s dictator on notice by increasing the penalty of its ballistic missile activity to a whole new level.  All Member States must do more to put more pressure on that country, she said, adding that the United States would take defensive measures to protect itself and its allies, including through joint military exercises.

China’s representative said that, while today’s resolution had imposed further sanctions, it did not intend to negatively impact such non-military goods as food and humanitarian aid.  Calling on all parties to implement the resolution’s provisions fully and earnestly, he recalled that China and the Russian Federation on 4 July had put forward a road map to resolve the issue through two parallel tracks — denuclearization and the establishment of a peace mechanism.  Recalling that the United States had recently indicated that it was not pushing for regime change or for the Korean Peninsula’s reunification, he said an escalation of military activities would be detrimental to all countries of the region.

Japan’s delegate said the sheer number and frequency of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile tests “show how unprecedented and unacceptable these provocations are”.  Not only was the quantity outrageous, but the qualitative advancements were alarming.  Noting that today’s resolution would reduce the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s revenue by approximately $1 billion, he said all Member States must demonstrate renewed commitment to implement the Council’s decisions.

The Russian Federation’s representative, while calling on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to end its banned programmes, said progress would be difficult so long as it perceived a direct threat to its security.  Emphasizing that military misadventures risked creating a disaster, he said sanctions must be a tool for engaging Pyongyang in constructive talks rather than to seek the country’s economic asphyxiation.

The Republic of Korea’s delegate said that Pyongyang’s missile provocations on 4 and 28 July, together with its nuclear programme, posed a grave threat to international peace and security.  Indeed, such reckless acts of defiance should be met with stronger measures, he said, adding that additional sanctions contained in resolution 2371 (2017) would significantly cut off the inflow of hard currency that would otherwise have been diverted to illicit weapons programmes.

Also speaking were representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Ukraine, Uruguay, Senegal, Sweden, Italy, Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, Bolivia and Egypt.

The meeting began at 3:06 p.m. and ended at 4:12 p.m.

Statements

NIKKI HALEY (United States) said the Security Council today had put the dictator of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea on notice by matching its words with action.  Through the resolution, the Council had taken a strong and united step, increasing the penalty of that country’s ballistic missile activity to a whole new level.  The text represented the single largest package of economic sanctions ever levelled at the regime.  The price it would pay would be one third of its exports and hard currency.  Furthermore, the resolution represented the most stringent sanctions on any country in years.

Emphasizing that nuclear and ballistic missile development was expensive, she said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was starving its people and enslaving them to fund its illegal programmes.  The United States would continue to stand up for the dignity and human rights of those people.  She added that, while the resolution marked a significant step forward, it was not nearly enough.  The threat of an outlaw regime would remain, demonstrating that wide-spread human rights violations went hand in hand with threats to international peace and security.  Commending China’s delegation for its important contribution to the resolution, she said all Member States must do more to put more pressure on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, adding that the United States would take prudent defensive measures to protect itself and its allies, continuing joint military exercises.  Today was a good day at the United Nations, but more would be needed to peacefully resolve a crisis created by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s illegal actions, she said.

MATTHEW RYCROFT (United Kingdom) said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s recent tests extended the threat to many more countries.  It was not business as usual, and that as that country’s missile capabilities advanced, so did its contempt and disregard for the Council.  It bore responsibility for the actions taken today, and by going against the will of the Council, it had chosen the path it now found itself on — a path that would, at a minimum, create more suffering, and at the most, prove catastrophic for the whole world.  The United Kingdom called on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to forego provocation, halt and reverse its missile and nuclear development programme, and to prioritize the well-being of its people.  Every country must ensure that the measures adopted by the Council were adhered to, he said, emphasizing that there was too much at stake.

FRANÇOIS DELATTRE (France) said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s development of a nuclear arsenal, at its people’s expense, was a global threat that put into peril the entire non-proliferation regime.  Weakness was not an option, he said, adding that the resolution could represent $1 billion in lost savings for the regime.  Noting that the resolution included a humanitarian exemption cause to mitigate the impact on that country’s people, he said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea must become aware of the fact that, with continued provocation, the Council would have no other choice than to further step up pressure.  Sanctions were not an end in themselves, he said, but were aimed at compelling Pyongyang to return to dialogue.  There was no other solution but firmness to put the regime on the path to reason.

YURIY VITRENKO (Ukraine), describing the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s advancing nuclear and ballistic missile programmes as all but the “most significant proliferation challenge of our time”, condemned Pyongyang’s continued illegal activities in the strongest possible terms.  Beside highly visible manifestations in the form of nuclear tests and missile launches, there was also an intricate system of sanctions evasion to circumvent the restrictions and prohibitions in place.  Today’s resolution, besides strengthening that regime, also reinforced it with additional sectoral and targeted sanctions and clarified some measures imposed earlier by the Council.  It also unambiguously confirmed the Council’s openness to dialogue on a peaceful and diplomatic solution to the situation on the Korean Peninsula and its intention to avoid affecting the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s population.

LUIS BERMÚDEZ (Uruguay), hailing the resolution’s unanimous adoption, emphasized that such unity was essential to responding effectively to the threat posed by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile programmes.  Its continued escalations undermined the spirit of peaceful coexistence that prevailed in the United Nations, he said, calling on Pyongyang to immediately comply with all the Council’s resolutions and abandon its nuclear weapons programme.  Stressing that all sanctions imposed to achieve those ends must be effective and fully accomplish their goals — and complementary to other tools such as mediation and dialogue — he noted that the measures imposed against the country should also strive to ease tensions, reduce the nuclear threat on the Korean Peninsula and bring Pyongyang back to the negotiating table.  Such measures must also avoid adverse humanitarian consequences on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s population, he said.

LIU JIEYI (China) expressed his country’s opposition to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s recent launches, which had defied the will of the entire international community.  China had always insisted on upholding peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and sought a diplomatic solution, he said, adding that, while today’s resolution had imposed further sanctions it did not intend to negatively impact such non-military goods as food and humanitarian aid.  Calling on all parties to implement the resolution’s provisions fully and earnestly, he recalled that China and the Russian Federation had issued a joint statement on 4 July and put forward a road map to resolve the issue through two parallel tracks — denuclearization and the establishment of a peace mechanism.  That plan, which was based on a “suspension-for-suspension” approach, was both realistic and feasible.  Recalling that the United States had recently indicated that it was not pushing for regime change in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea or for the reunification of the Koreas, he expressed hope that it would adhere to its promises not to push its troops through the thirty-eight parallel north.  Indeed, escalating such military activities would be detrimental to all countries of the region, he said.

VASSILY ALEKSEEVICH NEBENZIA (Russian Federation) called on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to end its banned programmes, return to the non‑proliferation regime and accept International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) oversight.  Progress would be difficult, however, so long as that country perceived a direct threat to its security, he said, citing military exercises by the United States and its regional allies, as well as the deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system.  Emphasizing that military misadventures risked creating a disaster, he said sanctions were a tool for engaging Pyongyang in constructive talks.  They were not to be used for the country’s economic asphyxiation.  Normalizing the situation would require a comprehensive approach that included a rejection of stepped-up military exercises.  Emphasizing the Russian Federation-China proposal of 4 July, he said it was time for joint efforts to seek a political solution, with the Organization stepping up humanitarian assistance to the people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

FODÉ SECK (Senegal) said that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s recent ballistic missile launches represented a serious threat to peace and security on the Korean Peninsula and beyond.  No warning had been given of those launches, which extended far beyond that country’s maritime jurisdiction.  Echoing the Secretary-General’s call for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to live up to its international obligations in a clear and verifiable way, he said Senegal welcomed the resolution’s exemptions for United Nations humanitarian assistance, adding that its targeted measures must be part and parcel of a global political strategy aimed to bring the parties to negotiations with a view to a political solution.

CARL SKAU (Sweden) said the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea must cease all development of its ballistic missile and nuclear weapons programme and re-engage in a credible dialogue with the international community, which for its part must act swiftly to implement the new sanctions adopted today.  Sanctions, however, would never solve the situation, he said, emphasizing an urgent need to avoid escalation and prepare for a peaceful, diplomatic and comprehensive solution.  He added that his country, as a member of the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission, strongly encouraged the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to resume contact and cooperation with that body at Panmunjom, thus contributing to reducing tensions while increasing trust and transparency.

INIGO LAMBERTINI (Italy) said the Council had today sent another unequivocal message that the international community was united in condemning the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s nuclear provocations, and ready to take further action in that regard.  “This is an extraordinary situation” which required a commensurate response, he said, noting that the sanctions imposed today would remain in place as long as Pyongyang’s violations continued.  Calling on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons activities in a complete, transparent and verifiable manner, he welcomed the fact that the measures imposed by today’s text were directed at the country’s Government and not at its population.  Calling on the Government to make credible progress in denuclearization, as well as to resume negotiations, he went on to stress that “sanctions are not and end in themselves”, but a tool to bring about those ends, and voiced Italy’s commitment to work to ensure that those measures were implemented fully and effectively.

TEKEDA ALEMU (Ethiopia) underscored the importance of the Council’s continued unity on the issue of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, stressing that, if handled with great care and wisdom, “this is perhaps the most critical factor to ensure a breakthrough eventually”.  The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea must immediately cease its provocative actions and prevent further escalation.  Noting that the adoption of today’s resolution had been “unavoidable” in the present context, he warned that the situation could get “out of hand” if handled improperly and emphasized the need to open more opportunities to pursue a diplomatic path.  “There is a need for channels of communication to avoid the risk of miscommunication and reduce tensions on the Peninsula,” he stressed, underscoring the need for dialogue and negotiations in that regard.  The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea must adhere to all its international obligations on denuclearization, he said, adding that the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1718 (2006) and the related panel of experts would continue to play a critical role in that regard.

BARLYBAY SADYKOV (Kazakhstan) welcomed the fact that today’s resolution, while imposing stronger measures, also left room for negotiations through the six-party dialogue mechanism.  Strongly condemning the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s recent irresponsible launches, he said such actions were in serious violation of Council resolutions and further destabilized the situation in the region and beyond.  They also undermined the international community’s collective efforts to pursue a future free of nuclear weapons.  Urging Pyongyang to immediately abandon its nuclear weapons programme, he also called on all parties to intensify their efforts to find a diplomatic solution to the issue through dialogue.

KORO BESSHO (Japan) said the sheer number and frequency of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile tests “show how unprecedented and unacceptable these provocations are”.  Not only was the quantity outrageous, but the qualitative advancements were deeply alarming.  The footage broadcast on Japanese television of the most recent launch had shown that it was visible with the naked eye in Hokkaido, as the missile had fallen into the sea off the coast of Japan.  If it had not been such a lofted launch, the missile range would have covered half the globe.  “It is abundantly clear that this is not merely a regional threat, but an imminent global threat to all Member States,” he said, noting that Pyongyang had continued to ignore the calls of the international community — including numerous Council resolutions — leading to the adoption of today’s “very impactful” text.  Noting that it would reduce the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s revenue by approximately $1 billion, he said that robust resolution represented an urgent call for Pyongyang to change its behaviour.  All Member States must demonstrate renewed commitment to rigorously and thoroughly implement existing Council resolutions, including the one adopted today.

SACHA SERGIO LLORENTTY SOLÍZ (Bolivia) said his country had been motivated by its pacifist ideals to vote in favour of the resolution.  Sanctions were not an end in themselves, he said, but rather they should contribute to helping the concerned parties to return to dialogue while having the least possible impact on the civilian population.  Urging all parties to avoid any escalation that would put international peace and security at risk, he welcomed the fact that today’s resolution included a request for the renewal of the Six-Party Talks.  He went on to call on all parties involved to rule out any military type of solution, adding that Bolivia rejected the imposition of unilateral sanctions.

AMR ABDELLATIF ABOULATTA (Egypt), Council President for August, spoke in his national capacity, emphasizing the importance of dealing with all threats to nuclear non-proliferation and of upholding the universality of the Non-Proliferation Treaty with no double standards.  Egypt hoped that all stakeholders would join hands to peacefully settle the situation in the Korean Peninsula, exercise restraint and adopt reciprocal de-escalation measures.  He added that his country welcomed any initiative or constructive idea leading to denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

CHO TAE-YUL (Republic of Korea) said Pyongyang had once again turned a deaf ear to the international community’s stern warnings and responded with even more serious provocations.  Coupled with its nuclear programme, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s missile provocations on 4 July and subsequently on 28 July posed a grave threat to international peace and security and required concerted actions at the global level.  Indeed, such reckless acts of defiance should be met with stronger measures in order to ensure that Pyongyang bore the consequences of its flagrant violations of international norms and obligations, he stressed, adding that the sectoral ban introduced by resolution 2371 (2017) would significantly cut off the inflow of hard currency into the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea which could otherwise have been diverted to illicit weapons programmes.  Through its unanimous adoption, the Council had once again demonstrated that the international community would remain united in its commitment to stop Pyongyang’s reckless and destabilizing behaviour.  The full and thorough implementation of the Security Council’s multiple sanctions resolutions was critical, he stressed, noting that Pyongyang’s “obsessive pursuit” of nuclear and ballistic missile programmes would only serve to strengthen the international community’s resolve.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2371 (2017) reads as follows:

The Security Council,

Recalling its previous relevant resolutions, including resolutions 825 (1993), 1540 (2004), 1695 (2006), 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 1887 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016) and 2356 (2017), as well as the statements of its President of 6 October 2006 (document S/PRST/2006/41), 13 April 2009 (document S/PRST/2009/7) and 16 April 2012 (document S/PRST/2012/13),

Reaffirming that proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, as well as their means of delivery, constitutes a threat to international peace and security,

Expressing its gravest concern at the July 3 and July 28 of 2017 ballistic missile tests by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), which the DPRK has stated were tests of intercontinental ballistic missiles, in violation of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016) and 2356 (2017), and at the challenge such tests constitute to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and to international efforts aimed at strengthening the global regime of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and the danger they pose to peace and stability in the region and beyond,

Underlining once again the importance that the DPRK respond to other security and humanitarian concerns of the international community,

Underlining also that measures imposed by this resolution are not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population of the DPRK,

Expressing serious concern that the DPRK has continued to violate relevant Security Council resolutions through repeated launches and attempted launches of ballistic missiles, and noting that all such ballistic missile activities contribute to the DPRK’s development of nuclear weapons delivery systems and increase tension in the region and beyond,

Expressing continued concern that the DPRK is abusing the privileges and immunities accorded under the Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic and Consular Relations,

Expressing great concern that the DPRK’s prohibited arms sales have generated revenues that are diverted to the pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles while DPRK citizens have unmet needs,

Expressing its gravest concern that the DPRK’s ongoing nuclear- and ballistic missile-related activities have further generated increased tension in the region and beyond, and determining that there continues to exist a clear threat to international peace and security,

Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, and taking measures under its Article 41,

“1.  Condemns in the strongest terms the ballistic missile launches conducted by the DPRK on 3 July and 28 July 2017, which the DPRK has stated were launches of intercontinental ballistic missiles, and which used ballistic missile technology in violation and flagrant disregard of the Security Council’s resolutions;

“2.  Reaffirms its decisions that the DPRK shall not conduct any further launches that use ballistic missile technology, nuclear tests, or any other provocation; shall suspend all activities related to its ballistic missile programme and in this context re-establish its pre-existing commitments to a moratorium on missile launches; shall abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programmes in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner, and immediately cease all related activities; and shall abandon any other existing weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile programmes in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner;

Designations

“3.  Decides that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall apply also to the individuals and entities listed in Annex I and II of this resolution and to any individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, and to entities owned or controlled by them, including through illicit means, and decides further that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (e) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall also apply to the individuals listed in Annex I of this resolution and to individuals acting on their behalf or at their direction;

“4.  Decides to adjust the measures imposed by paragraph 8 of resolution 1718 (2006) and this resolution through the designation of additional goods, directs the Committee to undertake its tasks to this effect and to report to the Security Council within 15 days of adoption of this resolution, and further decides that, if the Committee has not acted, then the Security Council will complete action to adjust the measures within seven days of receiving that report;

“5.  Decides to adjust the measures imposed by paragraph 7 of resolution 2321 (2016) through the designation of additional conventional arms‑related items, materials, equipment, goods and technology, directs the Committee to undertake its tasks to this effect and to report to the Security Council within 30 days of adoption of this resolution, further decides that, if the Committee has not acted, then the Security Council will complete action to adjust the measures within seven days of receiving that report, and directs the Committee to update this list every 12 months;

Transportation

“6.  Decides that the Committee may designate vessels for which it has information indicating they are, or have been, related to activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017) or this resolution and all Member States shall prohibit the entry into their ports of such designated vessels, unless entry is required in the case of emergency or in the case of return to its port of origination, or unless the Committee determines in advance that such entry is required for humanitarian purposes or any other purposes consistent with the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017), or this resolution;

“7.  Clarifies that the measures set forth in paragraph 20 of resolution 2270 (2016) and paragraph 9 of resolution 2321 (2016), requiring States to prohibit their nationals, persons subject to their jurisdiction and entities incorporated in their territory or subject to their jurisdiction from owning, leasing, operating any vessel flagged by the DPRK, without exception, unless the Committee approves on a case-by-case basis in advance, apply to chartering vessels flagged by the DPRK;

Sectoral

“8.  Decides that paragraph 26 of resolution 2321 (2016) shall be replaced by the following:

“9.  Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, coal, iron and iron ore, and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such material from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, and whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, decides that for sales and transactions of iron and iron ore for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 30 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 45 days after the date of adoption of this resolution, and decides further that this provision shall not apply with respect to coal that the exporting State confirms on the basis of credible information has originated outside the DPRK and was transported through the DPRK solely for export from the Port of Rajin (Rason), provided that the exporting State notifies the Committee in advance and such transactions involving coal originating outside of the DPRK are unrelated to generating revenue for the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programmes or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017) or this resolution;

10. Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, seafood (including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and other aquatic invertebrates in all forms), and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such items from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, and further decides that for sales and transactions of seafood (including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and other aquatic invertebrates in all forms) for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 30 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 45 days after the date of adoption of this resolution;

“11. Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, lead and lead ore, and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such items from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, and further decides that for sales and transactions of lead and lead ore for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 30 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 45 days after the date of adoption of this resolution;

“12. Expresses concern that DPRK nationals frequently work in other States for the purpose of generating foreign export earnings that the DPRK uses to support its prohibited nuclear and ballistic missile programmes, decides that all Member States shall not exceed on any date after the date of adoption of this resolution the total number of work authorizations for DPRK nationals provided in their jurisdictions at the time of the adoption of this resolution unless the Committee approves on a case-by-case basis in advance that employment of additional DPRK nationals beyond the number of work authorizations provided in a Member State’s jurisdiction at the time of the adoption of this resolution is required for the delivery of humanitarian assistance, denuclearization or any other purpose consistent with the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017) or this resolution;

Financial

“13. Decides that States shall prohibit, by their nationals or in their territories, the opening of new joint ventures or cooperative entities with DPRK entities or individuals, or the expansion of existing joint ventures through additional investments, whether or not acting for or on behalf of the government of the DPRK, unless such joint ventures or cooperative entities have been approved by the Committee in advance on a case-by-case basis;

“14. Clarifies that the prohibitions contained in paragraph 11 of resolution 2094 (2013) apply to clearing of funds through all Member States’ territories;

“15. Clarifies that companies performing financial services commensurate with those provided by banks are considered financial institutions for the purposes of implementing paragraph 11 of resolution 2094 (2013), paragraphs 33 and 34 of resolution 2270 (2016), and paragraph 33 of resolution 2321 (2016);

Chemical Weapons

“16. Recalls paragraph 24 of resolution 2270 (2016), decides that the DPRK shall not deploy or use chemical weapons, and urgently calls upon the DPRK to accede to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and Their Destruction, and then to immediately comply with its provisions;

Vienna Convention

“17. Demands that the DPRK fully comply with its obligations under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations and the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations;

Impact on the People of the DPRK

“18. Regrets the DPRK’s massive diversion of its scarce resources toward its development of nuclear weapons and a number of expensive ballistic missile programmes, notes the findings of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance that well over half of the people in the DPRK suffer from major insecurities in food and medical care, including a very large number of pregnant and lactating women and under-five children who are at risk of malnutrition and nearly a quarter of its total population suffering from chronic malnutrition, and, in this context, expresses deep concern at the grave hardship to which the people in the DPRK are subjected;

Sanctions Implementation

“19. Decides that Member States shall report to the Security Council within 90 days of the adoption of this resolution, and thereafter upon request by the Committee, on concrete measures they have taken in order to implement effectively the provisions of this resolution, requests the Panel of Experts, in cooperation with other UN sanctions monitoring groups, to continue its efforts to assist Member States in preparing and submitting such reports in a timely manner;

“20. Calls upon all Member States to redouble efforts to implement in full the measures in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013) 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016) and 2356 (2017), and to cooperate with each other in doing so, particularly with respect to inspecting, detecting and seizing items the transfer of which is prohibited by these resolutions;

“21. Decides that the mandate of the Committee, as set out in paragraph 12 of resolution 1718 (2006), shall apply with respect to the measures imposed in this resolution and further decides that the mandate of the Panel of Experts, as specified in paragraph 26 of resolution 1874 (2009) and modified in paragraph 1 of resolution 2345 (2017), shall also apply with respect to the measures imposed in this resolution;

“22. Decides to authorize all Member States to, and that all Member States shall, seize and dispose (such as through destruction, rendering inoperable or unusable, storage, or transferring to a State other than the originating or destination States for disposal) of items the supply, sale, transfer or export of which is prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017), or this resolution that are identified in inspections, in a manner that is not inconsistent with their obligations under applicable Security Council resolutions, including resolution 1540 (2004), as well as any obligations of parties to the NPT, the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Development of 29 April 1997, and the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction of 10 April 1972;

“23. Emphasizes the importance of all States, including the DPRK, taking the necessary measures to ensure that no claim shall lie at the instance of the DPRK, or of any person or entity in the DPRK, or of persons or entities designated for measures set forth in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017) or this resolution, or any person claiming through or for the benefit of any such person or entity, in connection with any contract or other transaction where its performance was prevented by reason of the measures imposed by this resolution or previous resolutions;

“24. Requests that Interpol issue Special Notices with respect to designated individuals, and directs the Committee to work with Interpol to develop the appropriate arrangements to do so;

“25. Requests the Secretary-General to provide additional analytical resources needed to the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1874 (2009) to strengthen its ability to analyse the DPRK’s sanctions violation and evasion activities;

Political

26. Reiterates its deep concern at the grave hardship that the people in the DPRK are subjected to, condemns the DPRK for pursuing nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles instead of the welfare of its people while people in the DPRK have great unmet needs, and emphasizes the necessity of the DPRK respecting and ensuring the welfare and inherent dignity of people in the DPRK;

“27. Reaffirms that the measures imposed by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017) and this resolution are not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population of the DPRK or to affect negatively or restrict those activities, including economic activities and cooperation, food aid and humanitarian assistance, that are not prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017) and this resolution, and the work of international and non-governmental organizations carrying out assistance and relief activities in the DPRK for the benefit of the civilian population of the DPRK and decides that the Committee may, on a case-by-case basis, exempt any activity from the measures imposed by these resolutions if the committee determines that such an exemption is necessary to facilitate the work of such organizations in the DPRK or for any other purpose consistent with the objectives of these resolutions, and further decides that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall not apply with respect to financial transactions with the DPRK Foreign Trade Bank or the Korea National Insurance Corporation if such transactions are solely for the operation of diplomatic or consular missions in the DPRK or humanitarian assistance activities that are undertaken by, or in coordination with, the United Nations;

28. Reaffirms its support for the Six-Party Talks, calls for their resumption, and reiterates its support for the commitments set forth in the Joint Statement of 19 September 2005 issued by China, DPRK, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation and the United States, including that the goal of the Six-Party Talks is the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner, that the United States and the DPRK undertook to respect each other’s sovereignty and exist peacefully together, that the Six Parties undertook to promote economic cooperation, and all other relevant commitments;

“29. Reiterates the importance of maintaining peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in north-east Asia at large, and expresses its commitment to a peaceful, diplomatic, and political solution to the situation and welcomes efforts by the Council members, as well as other States to facilitate a peaceful and comprehensive solution through dialogue and stresses the importance of working to reduce tensions in the Korean Peninsula and beyond;

“30. Affirms that it shall keep the DPRK’s actions under continuous review and is prepared to strengthen, modify, suspend or lift the measures as may be needed in light of the DPRK’s compliance, and, in this regard, expressesits determination to take further significant measures in the event of a further DPRK nuclear test or launch;

“31. Decides to remain seized of the matter.”

Annex I

Travel Ban/Asset Freeze (Individuals)

1.    CHOE CHUN YONG

a.    Description: Representative for Ilsim International Bank, which is affiliated with the DPRK military and has a close relationship with the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation.  Ilsim International Bank has attempted to evade United Nations sanctions.
b.    A.K.A.: Ch’oe Ch’un-yo’ng
c.    Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 654410078; Gender: male

2.    HAN JANG SU

a.    Description: Chief Representative of the Foreign Trade Bank.
b.    A.K.A.: Chang-Su Han
c.    Identifiers: DOB: November 08, 1969; POB: Pyongyang, DPRK; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 745420176, expires on October 19, 2020; Gender: male

3.    JANG SONG CHOL

a.    Description: Jang Song Chol is a Korea Mining Development Corporation (KOMID) representative overseas.
b.    A.K.A.: n/a
c.    Identifiers: DOB: 12 March 1967; Nationality: DPRK

4.    JANG SUNG NAM

a.    Description: Chief of an overseas Tangun Trading Corporation branch, which is primarily responsible for the procurement of commodities and technologies to support the DPRK’s defence research and development programmes.
b.    A.K.A.: n/a
c.    Identifiers: DOB: July 14, 1970; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 563120368, issued on March 22, 2013; Passport expiration date: March 22, 2018; Gender: male

5.    JO CHOL SONG

a.    Description: Deputy Representative for the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation, which provides financial services in support to Tanchon Commercial Bank and Korea Hyoksin Trading, a subordinate entity of Korea Ryonbong General Corporation.
b.    A.K.A.: Cho Ch’o’l-so’ng
c.    Identifiers: DOB: September 25, 1984; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 654320502, expires on September 16, 2019; Gender: male

6.    KANG CHOL SU

a.    Description: Official for Korea Ryonbong General Corporation, which specializes in acquisition for the DPRK’s defence industries and support for the DPRK’s military-related overseas sales. Its procurements also likely support the DPRK’s chemical weapons programme.
b.    A.K.A.: n/a
c.    Identifiers: DOB: February 13, 1969; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 472234895

7.    KIM MUN CHOL

a.    Description: Representative for Korea United Development Bank.
b.    A.K.A.: Kim Mun-ch’o’l
c.    Identifiers: DOB: March 25, 1957; Nationality: DPRK

8.    KIM NAM UNG

a.    Description: Representative for Ilsim International Bank, which is affiliated with the DPRK military and has a close relationship with the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation.  Ilsim International Bank has attempted to evade United Nations sanctions.
b.    A.K.A.: n/a
c.    Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 654110043

9.    PAK IL KYU

a.    Description: Official for Korea Ryonbong General Corporation, which specializes in acquisition for DPRK’s defence industries and support to Pyongyang’s military-related sales. Its procurements also likely support the DPRK’s chemical weapons programme.
b.    A.K.A.: Pak Il-Gyu
c.    Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 563120235; Gender: male

List Update for Aliases

— JANG BOM SU (KPi.016) – New AKA: Jang Hyon U with date of birth 22 February 1958 and diplomatic passport number 836110034, which expires on 1 January 2020.

— JON MYONG GUK (KPi.018) – New AKA: Jon Yong Sang with date of birth 25 August 1976 and diplomatic passport number 836110035, which expires on 1 January 2020.

Annex II

Asset Freeze (Entities)

1.    FOREIGN TRADE BANK (FTB)

a.    Description: Foreign Trade Bank is a State-owned bank and acts as the DPRK’s primary foreign exchange bank and has provided key financial support to the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation.
b.    AKA: n/a
c.    Location: FTB Building, Jungsong-dong, Central District, Pyongyang, DPRK

2.    KOREAN NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY (KNIC)

a.    Description: The Korean National Insurance Company is a DPRK financial and insurance company and is affiliated with Office 39.
b.    AKA: Korea Foreign Insurance Company
c.    Location: Central District, Pyongyang, DPRK

3.    KORYO CREDIT DEVELOPMENT BANK

a.    Description: Koryo Credit Development Bank operates in the financial services industry in the DPRK’s economy.
b.    AKA: Daesong Credit Development Bank; Koryo Global Credit Bank; Koryo Global Trust Bank
c.    Location: Pyongyang, DPRK

4.    MANSUDAE OVERSEAS PROJECT GROUP OF COMPANIES

a.    Description:  Mansudae Overseas Project Group of Companies engaged in, facilitated, or was responsible for the exportation of workers from the DPRK to other nations for construction-related activities including for statues and monuments to generate revenue for the Government of the DPRK or the Workers’ Party of Korea.  The Mansudae Overseas Project Group of Companies has been reported to conduct business in countries in Africa and Southeast Asia including Algeria, Angola, Botswana, Benin, Cambodia, Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Malaysia, Mozambique, Madagascar, Namibia, Syria, Togo and Zimbabwe.
b.    AKA: Mansudae Art Studio
c.    Location: Pyongyang, DPRK

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