Home » General » Health and Social Woe Herbalists Hit Gweru

SELF-PROCLAIMED herbalists who claim to ‘cure’ social and health problems, including HIV, winning the lotto and fending off tokoloshis, have hit the city of Gweru.

Distributors of flyers highlighting the healers’ various areas of specialisation can be seen at every corner in the Midlands capital.

The herbalists claim to heal an assortment of problems from serious health issues such as HIV and AIDS, sexually transmitted illnesses (STIs) and diabetes to social problems like broken relationships and promotion at work.

One such ‘healer’, who calls himself Dr Wakho in one of his flyers, promises potential clients “100 percent safe and guaranteed results”.

Dr Wakho, who says he comes from Kilimanjaro, has his mobile number on the flyers though a physical address for his “practice” is conspicuous by its absence.

And, just like other professionals, the herbalist is available between 8am and 5:30pm during weekdays and from 8am to 2pm on Saturday. He can also help Sundays and public holidays through appointment.

“We do home visits and consultations on phone,” Dr Wakho adds.

When NewZimbabwe.com rang the herbalist on mobile number 0783869394, the “doctor” said his consultation fee was $10 per patient, adding that an appointment could be scheduled in the city centre.

Other issues the herbalist claims to solve include attraction of more customers for businesses, winning the lotto and horse betting, winning courts cases, passing exams, pregnancy problems and chasing away tokoloshis.

The herbalist also offers sex booster creams which he claims have no side effects.

However, Gweru-based social scientist, Caven Masuku, warned people against falling prey to bogus healers who claim to offer solutions for their problems.

“It’s better to deal with registered health centres than unknown people whom you might fail to trace when problems arise,” he said.

Masuku said the socio-economic problems that have bedevilled country for more than a decade were forcing desperate people to seek solutions “unfortunately in dubious corners”.

Source : New Zimbabwe

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