Home » Governance » I Am Not Mphoko’s PA, Mnangagwa Tells Parly

VICE PRESIDENT Emmerson Mnangagwa and the Speaker of Parliament Jacob Mudenda have clashed over the non-attendance of the country’s second VP Phelekezela Mphoko in the house of assembly.

Since his appointment as the country’s second vice President in December last year, Mphoko has not attended a single parliament session.

According to the constitution Vice Presidents are mandated to attend parliament and respond to issues which would have been asked by law makers.

The clash between Mnangagwa and Mudenda on Wednesday in parliament arose after MDC-T chief whip Innocent Gonese had asked the VP to explain to the house why his counterpart (Mphoko) was not attending.

“May the honorable vice President Mnangagwa tell the house if he has ever appraised his fellow colleague of the standing order and the constitution which say that all Vice presidents are obliged to attend parliament and answer questions,” Gonese asked amid ululation from members of parliament from his party.

Mudenda then asked Mnangagwa to respond but the VP declined to answer. It was after Mudenda had asked Mnangagwa for the second time to respond that he said:

“It is the duty of the speaker to rule on the issue,” before reluctantly informing the house that, “Vice President Mphoko has his choices on whether to attend parliament or not, besides I am not his personal clerk. He himself is quite aware that he has to come to parliament”.

Trying to cool down the clash Mudenda then said it was the duty of the chair (himself) to tell VP Mphoko to attend parliament.

MDC-T legislators said they wanted VP Mphoko to answer questions on several issues including the on-going Matebeleland South Maleme Farm dispute, his controversial statements on vendors early this year when he said vendors were “lazy”.

The statement angered vendors who blame government for failing to create jobs for thousands of youths who have turned into vending.

Mphoko also recently said the Gukurahundi genocide was a ‘conspiracy’.

Source : New Zimbabwe

Archives