Home » Arts & Culture » Mannex Steals Show At Bob Marley Concert

Trendy reggae musician Emmanuel Motsi, popularly known as Mannex, and his Transit Crew band stole the limelight at the Bob Marley Commemoration: Part 2, which was held at the Book Cafeacute on Saturday. The musician was probably the reason why many Book Cafeacute patrons requested for the Bob Marley Commemoration remake as he had previously astonished the crowd at the same event that took place over a week ago.

Motsi performed a number of the late musician’s greatest hits which include “One Love”, “Stir it Up” and “Zion”, much to the crowd’s delight as they sang and danced along.

The Transit Crew proved why they are rated as one of Africa’s best reggae bands as they professionally played their instruments almost as good as Bob Marley’s band, The Wailers.

The veterans proved to the crowd that experience pays off as they astoundingly produced sweet and well orchestrated melodies that qualify for any reggae accolade.

In an interview with the The Herald Entertainment, Motsi revealed where he gets his motivation and expressed his gratitude to the fans who came in support of the tribute to the legendary reggae icon.

“My friend, reggae music has always been my first love and I got my inspiration from Bob Marley himself as his music has always been my motivator.

“I am really delighted for this opportunity to perform in front of this splendid crowd who came in their numbers in tribute to the king and founder of reggae music, Bob Marley.

“Also, I owe this immense contribution to my band, Transit Crew, as they have lent a hand in my transformation to be the musician that I am today,” he said.

Saturday’s Bob Marley Commemoration show attracted a much bigger crowd than the first one which was held a week ago as the venue was packed to the brim with Rastafarians and those who love reggae music.

Mannex is well known in regae circles as he made his name with Bootkin Klan, who dominated the industry with their hit songs “Anoti Nyo” and “Munhu Mutema”.

Source : The Herald

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