Home » Governance » NCA – MDC-T’s Anti-Mugabe Politics Have Failed

The National Constitutional Assembly (NCA) says the MDC-T’s anti Mugabe politics have failed as evidenced by the party’s failure to dislodge the ageing president from power in the last 15 years.

Professor Lovemore Madhuku’s party said the MDC-T “spent more time” focusing on Mugabe instead of challenging “repressive” laws and institutions that keep him in power.

“This is the problem with our friends in the MDC. They concentrate on Mugabe forgetting that there are laws and institutions which cement his permanent stay in power,” NCA spokesperson Madock Chivasa told NewZimbabwe.com in an interview.

“This will not help even if Mugabe leaves office. Even if Emmerson Mnangagwa or anyone from his party takes over, he or she will still use the same institutions to cling on to power.”

Chivasa said the opposition parties should mount pressure on the ZANU (PF) government so that it democratises public institutions through reforms rather than calling for the retirement of the aging Zimbabwean leader.

“As long as institutions like the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission and the Zimbabwe Media Commission remain in the hands of government, ZANU (PF) will rule forever”.

“As NCA this is the gap we have seen and we are going to pile pressure on government to implement democratic reforms so that systems which guarantee and foster Mugabe’s continued stay in power are outlawed.

“For us, the starting point is the Constitution which we believe needs to be addressed and make sure that it does not give a president timeless tenure of office and empower him to personalise the nation like what is currently happening,” said Chivasa.

NCA broke ties with its long-time ally, the MDC-T, after the Morgan Tsvangirai led opposition party joined ZANU (PF) in a power sharing government which lasted for five years.

The then Constitution lobby organisation disagreed and continues to argue that political parties should not write a national Constitution as was prescribed by power sharing pact.

Source : New Zimbabwe

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