Home » Governance » Potraz Threatens Doves With Closure

Thenbsp country’s oldest funeral services company, Doves, risks being closed for violating the Postal and Telecommunications Act after it was established it has for years been operating a mini radio station without a licence.

Postal and Telecommunications Regulatory Authority of Zimbabwe (Potraz) officials pounced on Doves’ Victoria Falls branch and recovered two base set equipment of a radio station, which the funeral parlour said it uses to communicate with its drivers.

Potraz’s threats to close down the funeral company were revealed at the appearance of Doves Funeral Service represented by its director Brian Vito at a Victoria Falls court recently.

The telecommunications regulator dragged Doves to court after the funeral Services Company failed to comply with an order to regularize its operations within seven days.

To operate a radio station or the use such equipment one needs a licence from Potraz.

On August 13 this year, a Potraz team led by Mfundisi Moyo-a radio frequency monitoring technician visited the Victoria Falls branch and unearthed the anomaly.

“When Doves Funeral Services could not produce a radio operator’s licence, they were given a seven days service termination order which compelled them to apply for a radio licence. However, on October 21, the same team visited the company and discovered that it was still in possession of the radio station base set without complying with the order,” said the prosecutor Takunda Ndovorwi.

The base set equipment was seized.

In defence, Doves’ director Vito said: ‘We use radio to communicate with our drivers from office. This set was now old and we haven’t used it for years. We didn’t intend to continue using them but intended to dispose of them and we contacted Potraz about that.”

Victoria Falls magistrate fined the company $200 for operating without a licence but Potraz still has to act on the company’s use of radio transmitters which may warrant its closure, according to the service termination order.

Source : New Zimbabwe

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