Home » Posts tagged "Environment" (Page 20)

Preventing Climate Change, Acknowledging Needs of Specific States Focus, as Second Committee Concludes General Debate

Preventing climate change, enhancing international cooperation, and acknowledging the needs of specific groups and categories of States were necessary to implement the 2030 Agenda and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, Member States said today as the General Assembly’s Second Committee (Economic and Financial) concluded its general debate.

“Climate change is a serious threat to development,” said the representative of the United Republic of Tanzania.  “Early entry into force of the Paris Agreement is vital.”  Many States noted the risks climate change posed to their development plans, be it through natural hazards, desertification, or negative effects on glaciers.

The African continent’s development was already being threatened by climate change, said the representative of Niger, speaking on behalf of the African Group.  Land degradation was also advancing, and African countries were among the worst hit, along with mountainous regions and headwaters nations that were at risk of glacial melt due to climate change.  The representative of Kyrgyzstan noted that climate change had already led to increased natural hazards, increased glacial melts, devastation of mountain ecosystems and resultant effects on societies.  By 2025, the total area of glaciers in Kyrgyzstan could be reduced by 30 to 40 per cent, with a resultant decline in water flows, she said.  It was urgent to protect glaciers in headwater countries.

Several States highlighted the status of middle-income countries.  Those countries continued to face special challenges.  The representative of Mexico underscored the role of middle-income countries, which had much of the world’s population living in extreme poverty, and it was necessary to rethink the criteria for graduation of those countries as official development assistance recipients.  The representative of Chile said the majority of the United Nations membership were or would become middle-income countries in the near term, and it was necessary to strengthen United Nations support to those countries.  Nor could per capita income be the only tool by which to measure countries.

Many speakers said that it was necessary to strengthen international cooperation and partnerships to achieve the 2030 Agenda.  The representative of Rwanda highlighted the need for solidarity with vulnerable countries that could easily face economic downturns with the change of a few commodity prices.  Financing for development was a key factor in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, as was international trade.

A number of States highlighted the importance of adopting the quadrennial comprehensive policy review.  The review, said the representative of Paraguay, “will be crucial for forging correct strategies in the coming years.  This must be in line with the 2030 Agenda and take into account countries in special situations, notably landlocked developing countries.”  The representative of Australia stressed that the review “helps set direction for the UN system to implement the 2030 Agenda.”

While the work of the Second Committee was important, it needed to change the way it operated to ensure its relevance, stressed the representative of Australia.  The Committee needed to adhere to deadlines to achieve outcomes, and countries required sufficient time for consultations and debate on resolutions in order to achieve consensus.

Also speaking today were the representatives of Japan, Tajikistan, Panama, Botswana, Republic of Korea, Mauritania, Iraq, Georgia, Peru, Kazakhstan, Sudan, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Mongolia, Venezuela, Turkey, China, Morocco, Myanmar, Costa Rica, Fiji, Kenya, Algeria, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, El Salvador, Ecuador, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Yemen, Kuwait, South Africa, Bhutan, Zambia, Nepal, Guinea, Serbia, Tunisia, Equatorial Guinea, Jordan, Argentina and Liberia.

Representatives from the State of Palestine, Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Labour Organization (ILO) and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) also spoke.

Statements

NOBORU SEKIGUCHI (Japan), recalling with regret that collective efforts towards the Second Committee’s revitalization had failed, stressed that “we must not reopen what we agreed to in 2015.”  The completion of the Committee’s work within the mutually-agreed deadlines should be strictly kept, while any programme budget implications that were not urgent, necessary or based on clear mandates should be kept off the negotiating table.  Describing Japan’s priorities for the upcoming session, he said the setting of the Committee’s deliberations on aspects of sustainable development should be well aligned with the 2015 international agreements, especially the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  Expressing his readiness to adopt the historic New Urban Agenda — which would draw a whole picture of sustainable urbanization over the next 20 years — he also underscored the importance of implementing the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and pledged to support the sustainable development of countries in special situations.  Discussions on the quadrennial comprehensive policy review were also critical, he said, underlining the need to devise a reform plan that included a broader perspective.

MAHMADAMIN MAHMADAMINOV (Tajikistan) highlighted the important milestones reached in 2015, including the third International Conference on Financing for Development, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on climate change.  There was a need to mobilize additional financial resources, notably official development assistance (ODA), the main component for financing development.  Countries that began their efforts to achieve a sustainable development agenda under less favourable conditions needed support.  Tajikistan was a host to a high-level conference on water and sanitation in August, and would put forth a draft resolution in the Second Committee on International Decade for Action, “Water for Sustainable Development, 2018-2028”, and encouraged all Member States to support it.

ISBETH LISBETH QUIEL MURCIA (Panama) noted that it had been a year since the 2030 Agenda had been adopted, stressing that the Second Committee was especially relevant in achieving its goals.  In stepping up its collective efforts, the Committee’s main work should be to strengthen the operational guide or road map towards those goals.  Adding that the Paris Agreement was vital for sustainable development, she said many Latin American and Caribbean nations had reaffirmed their commitments to combat climate change.  Panama had set up an international centre to ensure implementation of the 2030 Agenda and inclusive development.  It was also seeking to become a carbon hub for the region by managing sustainable forests and combating deforestation.

SALVADOR DE LARA RANGEL (Mexico) said that, with the adoption of the 2030 Agenda framing development as a vital cornerstone of the United Nations agenda, it was now up to the Organization and its development system to align itself to that agenda and to modify its approach.  The quadrennial comprehensive policy review extended to sustainable development and provided an opportunity to make the changes needed.  His country had been an active promoter of financing for development.  A cross‑cutting, multidimensional approach for financing was needed to push sustainable development forward.  He also underscored the role of middle-income countries, which had much of the world’s population living in extreme poverty.  It was necessary to rethink the criteria for graduation of those countries as ODA recipients.

TLHALEFO BASTILE MADISA (Botswana) said landlocked developing countries were faced with various challenges, including high transport costs, dependence on a single or limited number of commodities for export earnings, remoteness and isolation from world markets and a cumbersome transit procedure.  Countries’ efforts to overcome such difficulties on their own were insufficient, and there was a need for greater international support from all stakeholders, including transit partners.  Stressing that trade for landlocked countries was also key in achieving development goals, he said the World Trade Organization (WTO) remained vital in integrating those nations into global trade.  Climate change was another issue needing serious attention, as it continued to impact all economic sectors, manifested by constrained agricultural production, increased food insecurity, prolonged drought and water stress.

OH YOUNGJU (Republic of Korea) said that, while the international community had been focused on galvanizing political will for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement, it must now create concrete actions for sustainable development.  To that end, the discussion on the quadrennial comprehensive policy review was vital in providing strategic guidance on the implementation of the sustainable development goals.  Furthermore, the reform of the United Nations development system should be based on gaps and lessons learned from the Millennium Development Goals.  With regards to the Paris accord, her country would “exert its best efforts” to ratify the instrument by the end of this year.  Parallel to that, her Government would also establish a national plan on climate change to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets, in addition to expanding its support to developing countries through the Green Climate Fund.

CARLOS OLGUÍN CIGARROA (Chile) said that the majority of United Nations membership were or would become middle-income countries in the near term.  It was necessary to strengthen the Organization’s support to those countries, as they faced special challenges in developing policies.  He believed it was important that per capita income could not be the only tool by which to measure countries.  On climate change, it was important to consider both mitigation and adaption, or else developing countries would be the most vulnerable.  Chile welcomed the flexibility shown by all nations on a new urban agenda in preparation for the Habitat III conference.

TUVAKO NATHANIEL MANONGI (United Republic of Tanzania), associating himself with the African Group and the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, said that review of sustainable development progress would help build ownership of the 2030 Agenda and create a virtuous cycle of implementation.  Studies had shown that land degradation was advancing and that African countries were among the worst hit.  Combating land degradation could contribute to easing forced migration flows influenced by a number of factors, including economic, social, security and environmental concerns.  That could in turn reduce current and potential fighting over resources.  He also called on all Member States to recognize the need to intensify efforts to enhance coherence and consistency of the international financial system and to tackle challenges confronting the global economy.  Welcoming the establishment of the Technology Bank for the Least Developed Countries, he warned that an abrupt cut of assistance towards new graduates could lead into falling back to their previous status.

EL HACEN ELEYATT (Mauritania) said the world was confronting several challenges, including terrorism and poverty, as well as underdevelopment in certain regions.  It was necessary to improve people’s welfare through the principles of mutual cooperation.  Noting that the 2030 Agenda was vital in transforming the world and achieving prosperity, he said Mauritania had set up a national programme to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.  His country had managed to alleviate poverty and its manifestations by improving income and increasing employment for youth.  The Government had adopted policies to empower women, who were now present in all sectors of society.  It had also established a social security programme that combated poverty and assisted vulnerable groups through health benefits and income producing projects.  In addition, it had worked to improve governance through transparency and by combatting corruption.

Mr. AL HAYANI (Iraq), associating himself with the Group of 77, said the market economy was still the global model for development, notably through trade, wealth‑generation and technological innovation.  An unregulated market economy, however, would exhaust natural resources and cause economic crises.  As such, global economic growth needed to take into account the sustainable use of natural resources.  The goal of the WTO was to ensure the necessary conditions so that everyone had an equal chance, including developing countries that had not benefited from globalization.  He reaffirmed the importance of having more flexible membership criteria for States that were currently WTO observers, such as his country.  Sustainable development and economic development in Iraq faced major challenges due to terrorism, which had attacked peaceful cities, affecting economic prosperity and discouraging foreign investment.

JUAN MANUEL PEÑA (Paraguay), associating himself with the Group of 77, said eradicating poverty was the greatest challenge facing the world.  The 2030 Agenda must be implemented, along with other international programmes and plans, including the Addis Ababa Action Agenda.  It was vital to improve the global infrastructure and optimize mechanisms for international cooperation.  Stressing that developing countries were especially vulnerable to natural hazards, he said landlocked countries deserved special focus, as they were at greater risk to hazards like droughts and floods.  The United Nations should strengthen support for landlocked countries through the work of the Second Committee.  ODA was vital in implementing the 2030 Agenda, as were increased investments, capacity-building and a more inclusive international trading regime.

NINO SHEKRILADZE (Georgia) said that Georgia had participated in the first round of national voluntary reviews on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, underscoring that “we all learn by doing, but we also learn better together”.  It was important that the United Nations system, with its technical expertise, supported Member States in implementing the Sustainable Development Goals.  The upcoming quadrennial comprehensive policy review would be central to ensure that the United Nations development system would perform its function effectively.  There was a financing gap for the implementation of the Goals, and innovative financing could play a significant role in addressing that, alongside domestic financial flows, foreign direct investment and ODA.  In that regard, Georgia, through the establishment of its Solidarity Fund, had become an active member of the global partnership on innovative financing.

MIRGUL MOLDOISAEVA (Kyrgyzstan), expressing her full supported for the 2030 Agenda, said that her country had actively begun its implementation.  Developing, mountainous, landlocked countries such as Kyrgyzstan faced unique circumstances and the inclusion of those issues in the Agenda was welcome.  Market access would help such landlocked developing countries achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.  Trade barriers and unilateral border closures were unhelpful.  Climate change had already led to increased natural disasters, increased glacial melts, devastation of mountain ecosystems and resultant negative effects on societies.  By 2025, the total area of glaciers in Kyrgyzstan could be reduced by 30 to 40 per cent, with a resultant decline in water flows.  It was urgent to protect glaciers in headwater countries.

JULIAN SIMPSON (Australia) said the Committee had a central role to play in ensuring that the General Assembly was focused on the 2030 Agenda and responsive to issues central to its implementation.  “We must change the way this Committee operates to ensure it remains relevant and valued,” he said, stressing that “business as usual won’t do”.  Indeed, the Committee must be a platform for constructive debate where Member States could work cooperatively.  It was important that all Member States allow time to consult, discuss and debate resolutions by ensuring that texts were submitted within set deadlines.  Calling for early warning of resolutions with possible budgetary implications, he said the Committee should avoid re-prosecuting recent leader-level agreements.  In addition, it should work efficiently to provide space to negotiate the resolution on the quadrennial comprehensive policy review, which would help set the direction for the United Nations system in implementing the 2030 Agenda.

GUSTAVO MEZA-CUADRA (Peru), aligning his delegation with the Group of 77, said countries had a shared responsibility to implement the 2030 Agenda in ensuring sustained economic growth and preserving the planet for future generations.  The sustainable development partnership called for a stronger global framework and assured financing for development.  It was urgent to honour commitments and develop mechanisms to make resources available in achieving the Agenda.  Stressing that human beings must be at the heart of global efforts, he said development meant inclusion and the safeguarding of cultural diversity.  It was also necessary to focus on disaster risk reduction and the impacts of climate change.  His Government promoted the sustainable development of mountain areas, where people were subject to increased vulnerability and poverty, a challenge for middle-income countries like Peru.  In addition, it supported innovative initiatives for collective action to increase access to water and sanitation.

RUSLAN BULTRIKOV (Kazakhstan) stressed the importance of empowering women and girls, as well as youth.  It was important that all 17 Sustainable Development Goals be achieved, he said.  Kazakhstan was planning a green economy with reduced greenhouse-gas emissions, and was committed to ratifying the Paris Agreement in 2016.  It was important to identify marginalized populations that the 2030 Agenda had not touched.  Conflict prevention and resolution were also important.  Kazakhstan had managed to restore part of the Aral Sea and was rehabilitating the land around the Semipalatinsk nuclear-testing site with the help of the United Nations.  To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, the efforts of landlocked developing countries would be needed to be matched by support from the international community.

ABU OBEIDA (Sudan), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, said the current session of the General Assembly was the first step towards implementing the 2030 Agenda.  His Government was focused on eradicating poverty, given its disastrous effects on people in his country.  All nations must progress in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, but developing countries faced challenges, including the slowdown of global economic growth, as well as the need for capacity-building, technology transfer and tighter cooperation, especially South-South.  It was also essential that a balance be reached in the international financial system to address unexpected shocks.  Countries, such as Sudan, also suffered from an external debt burden, which negated ODA benefits and other sources of funding.  In addition, they needed access to international trade markets, which would help drive development and growth.

JO TONG HYON (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) said that the independent right to development of all Member States should be respected for the successful implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals.  It was necessary to transcend differences in ideologies and social systems.  Coercive measures, such as sanctions, blockades and pressure imposed by a few countries against others, damaged development efforts.  The monopolistic control by a few countries of the World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF) and WTO could not be tolerated any further.  His Government would make every effort, despite the constant nuclear war threats, economic blockades and sanctions against it, to replace the old international order with a new one and to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

SUKHBOLD SUKHEE (Mongolia), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the Group of Landlocked Developing Countries, outlined his nation’s development plan in the area of reducing income inequality, ensuring quality education and achieving ecological balance.  Mongolia was also working on bringing about more efficiency and transparency in governance.  Challenges facing landlocked countries did not only affect economic growth, but also had major implications for social and environmental aspects of development.  Mongolia was certainly affected by climate change, but it also faced several “special human activities” that led to its serious desertification.  For example, poor crop cultivation practices were causing oil erosion.  Mongolia’s urban population had increased sharply in recent years with 68 per cent of people living in urban areas.  The capital’s population had doubled in just the last two decades.  Such rapid urbanization had caused myriad challenges including unemployment, congested traffic and pollution.

RAFAEL DARÍO RAMÍREZ CARREÑO (Venezuela) said the premise of the Bolivarian revolution was to ensure the greatest happiness for the country’s people.  Venezuela had a “Poverty Zero” plan for 2019, and would continue to reduce exclusion and seek greater equity to transform the lives of its people.  The capitalist system was unjust and generated poverty, and a fair international trade system was needed.  Venezuela advocated for reform of the international financial architecture, which was unjust towards the poorest countries.  Its decision-making processes needed to be democratized.  The sovereign management of natural resources should be considered as an alternative to control of these resources by transnational corporations.  War and conflict hindered development in many countries in the Middle East and Africa, and it was necessary to put an end to foreign interference in domestic matters.

BARIŞ CEYHUN ERCIYES (Turkey) said that his country was not only a reliable donor both in development cooperation and humanitarian assistance but was also hosting the largest refugee population in the world, totalling 3 million people.  Migration could contribute to sustainable development through proper management, common strategies and proactive dialogue.  “Any strategy can be successful if it is carried out collectively,” he said, adding that individual efforts simply could not produce lasting solutions.  Greater international cooperation, burden- and responsibility-sharing were needed to assist host countries and communities.  Turkey welcomed the recent consensus reached for refugees and migrants and expected the international community to meet its commitments to better respond to the global phenomenon.  On climate change, Turkey believed that water and sanitation were vital elements of the 2030 Agenda.  In regards to Member States’ support to build a new global water architecture, he stressed that such steps be taken cautiously and conducted in transparent manner.

WU HAITAO (China), associating himself with the Group of 77 , said it was important to stick to the path of win-win cooperation and honour ODA, especially in helping developing countries enhance capacity.  It was also vital to improve global economic governance and create an enabling international environment for development.  Efforts should be directed towards building an open-world economy.  The United Nations must continue to play a central role in coordinating such development efforts.  Countries would do better by strengthening communication and coordination in macro-economic policy in order to avoid negative spillover.  As the second largest economy in the world, his Government had taken measures to adapt to the “new normal” of its economic development, including upgrading its economic structure and adding new drivers for economic and social development.  China had engaged in an “all-out” endeavour to achieve sustainable development.

OMAR HILALE (Morocco), associating himself with the Group of 77, said his country had integrated the 2030 Agenda directly into its Government’s policies and plans.  It had set implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals as a socioeconomic reference point, including women and youth in the process.  The Government had dedicated more than 54 per cent of its budget to financing the social sector to improve living conditions and eliminate social inequalities.  In promoting sustainable and renewable methods of consumption, Morocco had reached ninth place in the world in reducing greenhouse-gas emissions.  Implementing the 2030 Agenda was an opportunity for the Government to adopt a development model that had sustainability at its centre, was mindful of equality and human dignity, focused on public and private institutional effectiveness, and targeted those who needed assistance.

EI EI KHIN AYE (Myanmar) said her country’s national economic and development policy was designed to meet the Sustainable Development Goals.  Food security, poverty alleviation and the promotion of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises were some of Myanmar’s top priorities.  In addition, building nationwide peace and security was paramount, and her Government was committed to the ongoing initiatives of the Panglong Peace Conference that intended to bring sustainable peace to the country.  Combating HIV/AIDS was another highly prioritized goal, she said, adding that the country’s national strategy plan focused specifically on prevention, treatment and care for priority populations.  Emphasizing the importance of close cooperation between developed and developing countries, she highlighted that ODA would continue to be important to developing countries as they pursued the 2030 Agenda.  Her delegation also underscored the importance of the quadrennial comprehensive policy review that would help developing countries achieve the 2030 Agenda and “narrow the development divide among the Member States”, she concluded.

JUAN CARLOS MENDOZA-GARCÍA (Costa Rica) said the Second Committee’s biggest challenge during the session would be the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals.  Public and private resources must be mobilized towards that end.  Implementation should be accomplished through the solidarity and transparency of all Member States.  It must consider the needs of the most vulnerable and include middle-income countries, which represented the largest number of Member States in the United Nations.  He also stressed the importance of the Paris Agreement and announced that his country planned to ratify the accord in the coming days.

LUKE DAUNIVALU (Fiji), associating himself with the Group of 77, Association of Small Island States and the Group of Asia and the Pacific Small Island Developing States, stressed that implementation of the 2030 Agenda would not be realized without adequate financing.  It was necessary that the Addis Ababa Action Agenda be further strengthened and nations formed a global partnership.  As his country had had too many experiences with the adverse impacts of climate change, he urged countries that had not done so to ratify the Paris Agreement.  Extreme weather events would be more frequently experienced if the international community failed to fulfil its commitments.  Discussions at this year’s Second Committee session should maintain the focus on combatting climate change and contribute to finding durable solutions that tackle its multidimensional threat.  For Fiji, as a large ocean State, the Pacific was a lifeline and its declining health must be reversed.

ARTHUR AMAYA ANDAMBI (Kenya), associating himself with the Group of 77, noted that at the time of the adoption of the 2030 Agenda, his country was already implementing its Vision 2030 through five-year medium term plans which embraced the three dimensions of sustainable development.  It was important to focus on the means of implementation defined under all Goals and number 17 in particular.  It was critical to mobilize sufficient resources to meet the financial demands of implementation.  For Kenya, now a middle-income country, it was necessary to seek increased foreign direct investment (FDI) and to mobilize domestic resources.  Kenya continued to build effective and capable institutions at the national level to coordinate both within and across ministries.

MOURAD MEBARKI (Algeria), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, described the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda as global achievements.  The 2030 Agenda would ensure eradication of poverty if needed resources could be mobilized.  Algeria had succeeded in implementing the Millennium Development Goals and was working on the Sustainable Development Goals by putting in place national mechanisms drawing in all stakeholders.  He noted, however, challenges in funding the Goals, especially considering the negative forecast of international finance.  The World Bank had suggested increasing ODA and tightening South-South cooperation to combat tax evasion and illicit financial flows.  The international community must pay special heed to the funding needs of Africa and assist it in becoming more competitive in international trade.  It was difficult to put in place global partnership mechanisms without solidarity among nations.  The South-South partnership was the best proof of solidarity, but South-North cooperation and technology transfer must also be enhanced.

MAYTHONG THAMMAVONGSA (Lao People’s Democratic Republic), associating himself the Group of 77, said it was incumbent on countries, United Nations agencies and other organizations to mobilize resources to ensure the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.  The Sustainable Development Goals had been mainstreamed into his Government’s national development plans.  The country continued to remove unexploded ordnance that continued to impair the livelihoods of its citizens.  Enhanced partnerships would be important to mobilize resources to support the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals.  Over the past years, the international community had provided support and assistance to his country, which had contributed to its efforts to eradicate poverty.  Climate change was a global challenge, if it was not addressed adequately, and no one country would be able to cope with or address it alone.  His nation was among the first group of countries to ratify the Paris Agreement and that accord would be implemented in an effective manner.

Ms. ABDULLAH (Malaysia) expressed concern about the global economic crisis, which was having a negative impact on smaller economies.  She called on the international community to strengthen global financial regulation.  Repercussions of the financial crisis in developing countries were always costly and disruptive, especially in mobilizing resources for development.  She stressed the importance of South-South cooperation, which complemented efforts of developing countries to achieve sustainable development, but said it should not replace North-South cooperation.  The 2030 Agenda and Paris Agreement were important milestones in paving the way for sustainable development, but the lack of financial resources in developing countries should be addressed.  It was also important to acknowledge that every country had its own challenges in implementing the Sustainable Development Goals.

ABDALLAH WAFY (Niger), speaking on behalf of the African Group and associating himself with the Group of 77, said the continent’s plans for sustainable development were informed by the African Union’s Agenda 2063 as well as the 2030 Agenda.  Noting that the Second Committee worked to concretize the international outcomes of 2015 — including the 2030 Agenda, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, the Paris Agreement and others — he said the importance of ensuring the adequate means of implementation could not be overemphasized.  In that regard, ODA commitments must be fulfilled and illicit flows of finance and resources out of Africa must be curbed.  While information and communication technologies (ICTs) were essential enablers for development, access to them remained a challenge for developing countries.  Restrictive trade measures created hurdles and made for an unfair international trade system.  Despite Africa’s insignificant contribution to the causes of climate change, it was also suffering from drought, flooding, climate-induced displacement and other climate-related challenges.  The international community should accelerate efforts to curb those negative effects, including at the upcoming Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to be held in Morocco.

RUBÉN ZAMORA (El Salvador), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), said it was important to speed up and implement recently signed agreements.  Those included the Paris Agreement, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda and the 2030 Agenda.  A fundamental task for the United Nations was to deal with the structure of the global financial and trade system, currently arranged to help the developed countries and punish those that were not developed.  Financing for development was critical to attaining the Sustainable Development Goals.  The definition of middle-income countries needed to be revised because those States featured structural imbalances which were not reflected in the per capita income numbers, but were systematically covered up by averaging out gross domestic product (GDP).  It was necessary to understand the changing and evolving needs of societies that were evolving at different levels.  El Salvador confirmed its support for reforming the world economic governance structure to ensure more effective and coordinated handling of important global issues.

HORACIO SEVILLA BORJA (Ecuador), associating himself with the Group of 77, said the need for structural change in the international financial system limited the ability of developing countries to implement the Sustainable Development Goals.  To promote international peace and stability, the international community must have a dialogue to increase transparency and good governance in that financial system.  Its excesses had widened inequalities in the world.  She noted that taxes were tools to increase wealth within and between societies, but stressed the need to eliminate tax evasion, illicit monetary flows and tax havens.  Equador’s tax havens currently held $30 billion, an amount which would contribute substantially to sustainable development.  She suggested creating a world government body that discussed tax issues in tackling the problem of such havens.

APPOLINAIRE DINGHA (Congo) said the Second Committee’s work was taking place at a time of slow economic growth and geopolitical concerns.  He expressed hope that the upcoming Habitat III conference would be a strong policy effort to open up development opportunities for the world’s cities and eradicate poverty.  The first session of the high-level political forum on sustainable development drew a picture of the development programme through the 2030 Agenda, and the Committee needed to take that work to heart as it proceeded.  It was necessary to have better capacity-building in operational terms for the United Nations system for implementing the Sustainable Development Goals.  The 2030 Agenda touched on all aspects of development, but nonetheless, to ensure its effective implementation and to eradicate poverty, it was necessary to strengthen partnerships.  Congo had a national plan and through it the country had committed to taking ownership of the 2030 Agenda.

PAUL LOSOKO EFAMBE EMPOLE (Democratic Republic of the Congo) was committed to implementing the Sustainable Development Goals, incorporating them into its national strategic plan.  The country sought to become a middle-income country by 2021, an emerging market by 2030 and a developed State by 2050.  The country continued its development and sought to reduce poverty, and had managed to have the appropriate economic and social infrastructure to improve the welfare of its population.  Climate change was an unprecedented global challenge and jeopardized the very future of humanity.  The Democratic Republic of the Congo was moving to finalize the ratification of the Paris Agreement by the end of 2016.  There remained a gap between developing and developed States, particularly among the least developed countries.  It was necessary to win the war against poverty so humanity would not suffer a failure of development.

NECTON MHURA (Malawi), associating himself with the Group of 77, Group of Landlocked Developing Countries and the Group of Least Developed Countries, said his country had undertaken several economic initiatives to address high inflation and the decline in GDP.  Malawi had suffered from recent weather-related setbacks as well.  Women were at the very core of any society’s success and with that in mind, Malawi had risen the age of marriage to 18 years and was focusing on programmes that boosted girls’ access to education.  As a landlocked developing country, his nation would feel the positive impact of infrastructural development specifically in the area of increasing the number of Malawians that had access to electricity.  He noted the inconclusiveness of the trade negotiations surrounding duty-free and quota-free market access to certain products and said that the stalemate had only exacerbated the challenges faced by landlocked countries.  Malawi called on its global partners to continue supporting programmes that increased access to education for everyone but especially for girls.

JEANNE D’ARC BYAJE (Rwanda), associating herself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, said that global development was a shared responsibility.  Solidarity needed to be encouraged to ensure that vulnerable countries could achieve sustainable development.  An over-reliance on a few key commodities had helped plunge many countries into recession, for instance.  Low or even shrinking growth would adversely impact the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, where growth of about 7 per cent annually was needed to eradicate poverty by 2030.  Rwanda would continue to invest in its people, enhancing citizen empowerment and community capacity-building.  It was imperative to respond to the aspirations of people; advance gender equality; tackle infrastructure and energy gaps; and realize that all actors needed adequate financing to implement the development agenda.

FREDERICK M. SHAVA (Zimbabwe), associating himself with the Group of 77, stressed the need for global partnership to achieve the 2030 Agenda, in the form of provision of financial resources, transfer of technology and capacity- building.  A supportive international environment, including an equitable multilateral trading system, was also critical for poverty eradication, as was follow-up on the Financing for Development agenda and reform of the international financial institutions to respond better to the needs of developing countries.  He expressed particular concern over the lack of commitment from some Member States in promoting cooperation on tax matters and addressing the problem of illicit financial flows.  On climate change, he urged developed countries to fulfil their commitments to provide means of implementation for adaptation and mitigation, in line with the Paris outcome.

TALAL ALI RASHED ALJAMALI (Yemen), associating himself with the Group of 77 and Group of Least Developed Countries, said that one year was not enough to evaluate progress but the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals could be reviewed and its successes and setbacks evaluated.  Those Goals would not have an impact on the poor unless they translated into action.  Yemen had signed the Paris Agreement and joined international efforts to preserve the planet, he said, emphasizing the principle of shared but differentiated responsibility.  Industrialized nations must accept their historic responsibilities.  Yemen was in a “particular situation” and “chaos was prevailing”, he said, adding that the country was now “struggling to reach relief” instead of focus on the development gains it had made.

ABDULLAH A KH A KH ALSHARRAH (Kuwait), associating himself with the Group of 77, said the Paris conference was extremely important in terms of dealing with climate change in a fair way.  The road map was done and now it was time to “shoulder responsibility” in the fight against extreme poverty.  It was critical to ensure respect for the environment and take into account ongoing climate change.  There were common but differentiated responsibilities for all to bear.  Conflict interfered with development and therefore it was critical to address immediate humanitarian needs and put an end to conflict worldwide.  Kuwait, as a high-income country, was doing its best to speed up new partnerships in various regions and was set on creating better living conditions for the people in its region.  “Our efforts had been somewhat successful,” he said, emphasizing that his country’s humanitarian assistance was in accordance with its values.

LAWRENCE XOLANI MALAWANE (South Africa), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the Africa Group, said the success or failure in implementing the 2030 Agenda would depend on adequate means of implementation and meaningful follow-up and review architecture.  Convinced that the financing for development and the 2030 Agenda processes remained on separate tracks, he urged development partners to honour their commitments on ODA.  Addressing illicit financial flows was crucial.  Upgrading the Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters should be upgraded into a universal and intergovernmental body which would provide developing countries with tools to deal with a number of tax related issues, including illicit financial flows.  To combat poverty, special attention should be given to agricultural development and food security.

KUNZANG C. NAMGYEL (Bhutan), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the Group of Least Developed Countries, said that, as a landlocked least developed nation, it had faced immense development challenges.  Stressing that the transformation in the 2030 Agenda period must take place within the least developed countries, he said Bhutan had begun integrating the Sustainable Development Goals into its national priorities in its development planning framework.  The support of development partners was critical to those endeavours, and success would ultimately hinge on the quality of partnerships between Governments, the private sector and civil society at the national, regional and global levels.  Likewise, the 2030 Agenda required a United Nations development system that was able to deliver integrated and coordinated policy support on the ground in response to national needs and priorities.  Noting that Bhutan had been identified as eligible for graduation out of the least developed country category, he emphasized that graduation must be seen in the larger context of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, and must be handled carefully.

MWABA P. KASESE BOTA (Zambia), associating herself with the Group of 77 and the Group of Least Developed Countries, said poverty, through its many offshoots, remained an overarching and pressing challenge around the world.  Promoting transformation and strengthening resilience of economies in Africa — especially countries in special situations — called for the active pursuit of industrialization.  Zambia had been creating a five-year national development plan aimed at fostering growth by initially placing a special focus on the development of rural areas that had the highest prospects for reducing poverty levels.  Other strategies included industrialization, appropriate infrastructure development and fostering rural development by focusing on agriculture and creating jobs.  It was also working to create Value Chain Cluster Programmes, diversification of the agricultural sector, promotion of forestry and Multi-facility Economic Zones and to prioritize infrastructure, energy, water, transport, communication, education and health.  Climate change also remained a national priority.

DURGA PRASAD BHATTARAI (Nepal), associating himself with the Group of 77, Group of Least Developed Countries and the Group of Landlocked Developing Countries, said that implementation of the 2030 Agenda had not yet begun in real terms.  It was important to find and urgently remedy the delay so that 2030 commitments could be translated into meaningful results on the ground, including poverty eradication.  Poverty was the worst enemy of humanity, serving as fertile breeding ground for most social ills, beginning with hunger and illiteracy and resulting in anger and even terrorism.  National commitments, ownership, leadership, people-centric and accountable governance systems must be complemented by robust international partnership to win the arduous battle against poverty.  He also stressed that the international community was obliged to help graduate least developed countries and ease structural deficiencies of landlocked developing countries, as agreed in programmes of action for those countries.  It was also important to note the huge potential of South-South cooperation, which could be a game changer in ensuring implementation of new agendas.

ALASSANE CONTE (Guinea) said the international community had committed itself to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.  Guinea had suffered two years of the Ebola outbreak and was now paying strict heed to the Goals.  In May, the new Prime Minister had promised to re-establish rule of law, kick-start the national economy and combat corruption.  The Government was the first pillar around which sustainable development progress should be made.  Economically, specialists had noted that Guinea could supply the world’s aluminium needs for a century.  The country was currently focusing on mining, creating a framework favouring investment.  Programmes had been signed for several billion dollars in investment, which could make Guinea the mining capital of West Africa.  A large programme had also been put in place to improve agriculture, which could make his country the bread basket of the region.

IVA JEMUOVIC (Serbia) said that her country had begun the process of updating its national strategy for sustainable development and the financing to go along with that.  Failure to achieve the “lofty” goals set was not an option.  Each country had a responsibility to attain sustainable development but sub-regional, regional and global cooperation was indispensable to that.  Moving on to climate change, she noted the massive and devastating floods that had hit Serbia two years ago and outlined myriad concrete actions taken by the Government including stemming greenhouse gas emissions.  On migration, she said that over the past year and a half more than 700,000 refugees and migrants transited through Serbia.  Currently, there were more than 7,000 migrants and asylum-seeking people in the country.  As a nation that had experience protracted displacement for more than 20 years, Serbia simply did not have the capacity to be a long-term, mass shelter for migrants.  A comprehensive European and global solution was vital to address that phenomenon.

MOHAMED KHALED KHIARI (Tunisia), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, said there was a growing international consciousness intent on reducing development gaps.  He called on the international community to provide means to implement the 2030 Agenda, referring to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda.  Stressing the importance of enhancing global partnerships, he pointed to the importance of abiding by agreed-upon development assistance for developing countries, especially in Africa, considering the harsh challenges they faced.  Due attention should also be paid to transition countries to overcome social and economic difficulties by reinforcing resources and transferring technology.  Efforts should also be made to eliminate tax evasion, illegal flows and financial corruption.  Finally, there was a need to facilitate the access of developing countries to special funds to alleviate the effects of climate change.

ANATOLIO NDONG MBA (Equatorial Guinea), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, said his country had taken into account domestic risks and vulnerabilities in its implementation of sustainable development.  Its administration had invested in projects with hopes that Equatorial Guinea would become an emerging economy by 2020.  Society was informed by the planned targets through various public campaigns.  State stability fostered development and from that standpoint, the State was a clearly defined public entity that could represent many interests but its very existence was absolutely fundamental.  “Speaking quite frankly, if there is no State, there could be no development,” he said, noting the various failed States worldwide whose development gains and hopes had been squandered.  Equatorial Guinea and its Government were committed to applying the development agenda and had already budgeted for it until 2020.  It was focused on diversifying its economy by being less dependent on resources.

NOUR MAMDOUH KASEB ALJAZI (Jordan), associating herself with the Group of 77, said that some development gains had been jeopardized by various factors including the recent flow of migration.  The number of displaced people worldwide was beyond 60 million, she added, emphasizing the need for an international response.  Partners, civil society and the private sector must join forces to address the phenomenon.  The Syrian crisis had substantially increased “the burden on Jordan’s shoulders”, she said, adding that her country had taken in 1.3 million refugees.  That caused problems with social infrastructure and availability of Government services but despite those immense challenges, Jordan remained committed to sustainable development.  Financing represented a major challenge, she said, underscoring the importance of ODA for both developing and middle-income countries.

MARTÍN GARCÍA MORITÁN (Argentina), associating himself with the Group of 77, said the 2030 Agenda recognized that the elimination of poverty was a serious challenge and crucial to sustainable development.  The Agenda provided a new framework for sustainable development and was universal in nature, eliminating imbalances and inequalities within and between countries.  It was a commitment that applied to all countries, considering the priorities and capacities of each.  Argentina had begun strengthening its institutional regulations to implement each part of the Agenda.  He stressed that climate change was the biggest challenge facing mankind today.  Argentina had attempted to improve its governance, setting up a national network on climate change to monitor reductions in emissions and determine steps to take in future years.  He also emphasized that operational activities for development must have a broader and greater role to help countries achieve the 2030 Agenda.  The international community must develop national capacity in developing countries and integrate South-South and triangular cooperation into the strategic plans of several United Nations agencies.

LEWIS G. BROWN (Liberia), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, said that while everyone had been analysing challenges pertaining to sustainable growth it was equally important to note that the Millennium Development Goals deepened humanity’s understanding of global poverty, rising inequality and pervasive injustice.  Liberia had embarked on the process of domesticating the Sustainable Development Goals through robust initiatives, working with the private sector, civil society and faith-based leaders.  Efforts to enhance national ownership were also manifested in several areas, including the national budget.  The focus was on a process of localization and decentralization.  With 42 per cent of biodiversity in the West African region, Liberia understood the importance of protecting the environment from the trappings of global warming and the effects of climate change.  It remained committed to the sustainable use of land and forests.

ABDULLAH ABU SHAWESH, observer for the State of Palestine, aligning his statement with that of the Group of 77, asked how the Second Committee could promote development when the people of Palestine faced acute challenges.  Israel was the occupying Power and was destroying in a systematic manner all pillars of development.  Forty eight years ago, Israel had occupied the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and since then Palestinian development had gone backwards.  Palestinian resources were being looted and depleted in full view of the international community, producing an imbalanced relationship where the Palestinians were being denied access to their natural resources while Israeli settlements were being enlarged.  The 2030 Agenda stated that peace and development were inseparable.  Israel continued to take hundreds of military actions depriving Palestinians of their right to development, notably through the policy of settlement expansion.  “They are terrorist settlers armed to the teeth, armed with racial ideologies,” he said, and added that it was high time to end the Israeli occupation.

BERNARDITO CLEOPAS AUZA, Permanent Observer of the Holy See, said the recent conclusion of many significant international commitments demonstrated a willingness among political leaders to come together to address global challenges.  At the same time, however, there had been a continued breakdown of trust as inequalities among and within countries had widened and the number of violent conflicts had increased.  A human-centred approach must form the centre of all efforts to address the interconnected challenges of environmental, economic and social development, he said, underscoring the need to avoid a reductionist approach that viewed the human person as an obstacle to development or, even worse, as the cause of his or her own underdevelopment and neediness.  Among other things, he called for a renewed commitment to just and equitable mechanisms for global trade and multilateral financial assistance, and warned against “global indifference” to the needs of others.  “The strength of international cooperation is based on the principle of one common humanity rooted in the equal dignity of all,” he said.

XOLISA MABHONGO, International Atomic and Energy Agency (IAEA), said that nuclear science and technology had myriad peaceful applications which could help countries reduce poverty and hunger, improve energy supplies, and diagnose and treat diseases.  When it came to treating cancer, numerous countries lacked both the equipment and the trained medical personnel.  In Africa alone, there were 28 countries which did not have a single radiotherapy machine.  The Agency was working to provide both technology and training to health professionals.  Two years ago, it had helped countries in West Africa deal with an outbreak of Ebola by providing diagnostic kits and laboratory supplies.  It was now adopting a similar approach in Latin America and the Caribbean in the response to the Zika virus.  It was also developing nuclear techniques to fight insect pests.  While energy was the engine of development, over a billion people still lacked access to electricity.  Nuclear power was one of the lowest-carbon technologies to generate electricity.

LAKSHMI PURI, Assistant Secretary-General and Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), urged Second Committee delegates to make gender-responsive implementation of the 2030 Agenda a central element.  The Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review should empower and reposition the United Nations development system to reflect the gender aspect of the Agenda and maximize its impact at the country level.  The Review should leverage normative gains of 2015 to help accelerate gender equality achievements and ensure no one was left behind.  It should also provide operational policy guidance on accelerating transformative results, as well as build and empower the next generation of gender equality champions across all United Nations entities.

CARLA MUCAVI, Director of the New York Liaison Office of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), said that 795 million people still suffered from chronic hunger, and over 70 per cent of the world’s poor and food insecure lived in rural areas of developing countries.  When opportunities for a decent life were not present, rural people were often forced to leave their homes.  Global action must be geared at overcoming constraints to accessing markets and resources.  Action must focus on building resilience, promoting sustainable approaches and supporting efforts to adapt to climate change.  It was also important to create jobs and opportunities that rural communities needed.  Rural development and improved food systems were also important parts of the effort to promote sustainable production and consumption and reduce food loss and waste.

VINICIUS CARVALHO PINHEIRO, International Labour Organization (ILO), said a major sustainable development challenge for the coming years was creation of decent jobs for young people.  Ongoing trends of low and jobless economic growth and dissemination of labour-saving technologies may impact the future of work could compromise Goal 8 of the 2030 Agenda.  ILO studies showed that, since the low-carbon economy was more job-intensive, work created by a transition to clean energy and more sustainable production patterns could more than offset the loss of jobs in emissions-intensive industries.  If managed well, transitions to environmentally and socially sustainable economies could become a strong driver of job creation, job upgrading, social justice and poverty eradication.

CHANTAL LINE CARPENTIER, Chief of the New York Office of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), expressed concern about the global economy as illustrated in UNCTAD’s recent Trade and Development Report and World Investment Reports.  “If we don’t get trade, investment, finance and technology right, and right now […] we will not achieve the Sustainable Development Goals,” she said, stressing that the Goals must be used to turn the global economy around.  Countries would need to pool their knowledge, tools and funds to support implementation, especially to the benefit of least developed, African, landlocked and small island States, as well as middle-income countries and others in special situations.  That was the only way to stem protectionism and isolationism and re‑establish globalization as an engine of inclusive prosperity for all.  UNCTAD was launching a multi-donor trust fund on trade and productive capacity and initiating deeper and more inclusive partnerships.

Read More

Sanctions could curtail sustainable development in Zimbabwe: Mugabe

21 Sep 2016

Listen /

Robert G. Mugabe, President of the Republic of Zimbabwe, addresses the general debate of the General Assembly's seventy-first session. UN Photo/Cia Pak

Ongoing sanctions against Zimbabwe could threaten sustainable development in the country, President Robert Mugabe told the UN General Assembly on Wednesday.

World leaders are reviewing progress on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as part of this year's General Debate.

It seeks to transform the world by eliminating extreme poverty, promoting greater equality and tackling the challenges posed by climate change.

Dianne Penn has the story.

President Mugabe said Agenda 2030 and Zimbabwe's own national development blueprint are practically the same.

However, he said the biggest impediment to achieving its objectives is 16 years of "punitive and heinous" sanctions.

The measures imposed by the United Kingdom, the United States and the European Union include travel bans and asset freezes.

"Those who have imposed these sanctions would rather have us pander to their interests at the expense of the basic needs of the majority of our people. As long as these economic and financial sanctions remain in place, Zimbabwe's capacity to fully and effectively implement Agenda 2030 will be deeply curtailed."

The President also addressed reform of the UN Security Council.

The Council consists of five permanent members—China, France, Russia, the UK and the US—and 10 non-permanent members who serve for two years.

Mr Mugabe said although the issue has been raised over the past 20 years, the international community is no closer to realising any reform of the chamber.

Dianne Penn, United Nations.

Duration: 1’19″

Read More

Forest Whitaker and Andrea Bocelli join Ban Ki-moon at the UN to shine a spotlight on progress of the global goals, one year on

Sep 16, 2016
  • Partners the United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Foundation, SDG Action Campaign and Project Everyone come together for the inaugural Global Goals Week
  • UN Secretary-General, PGA, Special Adviser for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, DPI and SDG Advocates including Forest Whitaker, Andrea Bocelli, Dr. Alaa Murabit and Richard Curtis call on all world leaders to implement the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030
  • Global Girls bus will tour New York, blasting messages from women and girls around the world from the #whatireallyreallywant campaign

Next week will mark the first anniversary of the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, signed by 193 world leaders on 25th September 2015 at the UN General Assembly. In the 7 days following, news of these Global Goals reached 40% of the world’s population, around 3 billion people.   

This year in order to keep up momentum and ensure all 17 Goals are achieved, the UN and partners from around the world are launching #GlobalGoals Week - an annual week of action, awareness and accountability for Sustainable Development. At the centre of this week will be ‘SDG Year 1’, a special session at the UNGA Opening which will call on all world leaders to implement the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 and mark progress in 2016.  It will include films, produced by writer, film-maker and SDG Advocate Richard Curtis, and feature SDG Advocates Forest Whitaker, Andrea Bocelli, Dr. Alaa Murabit, the President of the General Assembly Peter Thomson and the UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon.

Throughout the week, UNDP, UN Foundation, SDG Action Campaign and Project Everyone, the founding partners of #GlobalGoals Week, will work with events and organisations such as the Social Good Summit, Global Citizen Festival, the office of the Special Adviser for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the World’s Largest Lesson and UNICEF, Leave No-One Behind partnership, Global Compact, Every Women Every Child, GSMA, the UN Department of Public Information and many more to promote action, accountability and awareness of the Goals. So this September starts the countdown for the next 14 years to ensure no one is left behind.

As part of #GlobalGoals Week and in the year Girl Power went Global, the messages from people around the world inspired by the film #WhatIReallyReallyWant, will be brought to NYC as world leaders gather. Issues like quality education, an end to violence, an end to child marriage and equal pay for equal work need to be top of every governments’ agenda in order to give the Goals the best possible start. With 110 million views, 40 million impressions on Twitter and global media coverage, produced by MJ Delaney and supported by original Spice Girl, Victoria Beckham and Mel C, the film inspired an overwhelming response on social media with people from all over the world sharing images of what they really want for girls and women. These messages will be brought to New York on a Global Girls bus with performers from the video and influential women at key events and moments throughout the week.

#GlobalGoals Week: 18th – 24th of September 2016

10 #GLOBALGOALS WEEK EVENTS IN NEW YORK  

  1. SDG Year 1 at the UNGA Opening Session – A unique SDG accountability moment including films, produced by writer, film-maker and SDG Advocate Richard Curtis, and featuring SDG Advocates Forest Whitaker, Andrea Bocelli and Dr. Alaa Murabit, the President of the General Assembly Peter Thomson and the UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon. This moment will call on all world leaders at the UN General Assembly to implement the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 and mark progress in 2016.  
  2. The Young Leaders Initiative - launched by the Office of the UN Secretary General’s Envoy on Youth, is announcing 17 Young Leaders (19–30) and champions for the SDGs recognized for their leadership and contribution to a more sustainable world, and representing every region in the world.
  3. The Social Good Summit -  will launch Global Goals Week with UNDP’s Helen Clark, the UN Foundation’s Kathy Calvin, Mashable’s Pete Cashmore, the 92nd Street Y’s Henry Timms and Yusra & Sarah Mardini from Syria. UNDP will spread the word of the Goals to over 80 countries including Yemen, Iran, N. Korea and Iraq. 
  4. UN Global Compact Private Sector Forum – 350 CEOs, government leaders, UN agencies and civil society will come come together to focus on the role of business in advancing sustainable development to prevent global instability. 
  5. Global Goals Awards Dinner – in partnership with the SDG Advocates, Unilever and UNICEF focusing on Global Girls and giving awards to those who have helped make progress towards Girl Goals. This will be the first annual dinner to mark accountability for the Sustainable Development Goals, and will call on all sectors – from the public, to civil society, government, media and business - to do more, and work together to achieve their implementation over the next 14 years.                 
  6. Solutions Summit – a summit highlighting projects and creative solutions advancing the achievements of the Global Goals
  7. Global Citizen Festival – The fifth Global Citizen Festival will focus on the achievement of the SDGs, bringing together musicians including Rihanna, Coldplay and Ellie Goulding, celebrities and world leaders in an effort to enact major policy commitments toward the issues of girls’ and women’s equality, education, health, water and sanitation, environment, finance and innovation, and food and hunger.
  8. The World’s Largest Lesson – in partnership with UNICEF has reached 160 countries since launch, and in 2016 is launching in India with Bollywood Actress Sonam Kapoor and youth organisations in 120 countries sending volunteers to teach lessons to younger children.    
  9. The Global Goals Mobile Campaign 2016 - includes an official SDG Action app produced by the GSMA, Project Everyone and DPI, participation of 17 mobile operator groups with 2 billion customers being asked to support the campaign, and 900 million people receiving a Global Goals text message. A live Mobile Show featuring the best of Global Goals week and in partnership with Global Citizen, will be made free to view on mobile, and a fun interactive feature will enable millions to text Mr. Bean and world leaders about what they love most in their world.
  10. The Global Girls Bus – As leaders attend a Special Session inside the UN Chamber on the SDGs, a Global Girls bus will begin a loud tour of New York, ensuring the messages received from women and girls around the world this year from the #WhatIReallyReallyWant campaign are heard loud and clear. The bus will bring together performers from the #WhatIReallyReallyWant video with leading women’s rights activists and public figures to shout about the progress that still needs to be made for women and girls.

Helen Clark, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme, said: "The UN has an ambitious agenda to end poverty, fix climate change, and address inequalities over 15 years. Now we need everyone to help make this a reality. Everyone needs to know about the Goals, and every September when world leaders gather for the opening of the UN General Assembly, we must emphasize the importance of delivery on the promises of the Sustainable Development Goals."

Forest Whitaker, Actor, Director, Producer and SDG Advocate said: "Our collective commitment to the 17 Global Goals is our most important defense in ensuring that the benefits of our modernizing world are shared among all nations and people and not just by the privileged few. These goals are intended to serve the interest of every woman, man, and child on our planet. And that means that achieving these goals is up to all of us. This has to be an international movement—a coming together of people and a rallying around a common cause on a scale. I believe we have the tools and the passion to make the Global Goals a reality."

David Nabarro, Special Adviser to the Secretary General for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Climate Change said: “In this first year anniversary – “SDG Year 1” – more than 50 governments, and also numerous businesses, scientists and civil society organizations have stepped up their efforts to make the SDGs a central framework for their policies and actions, and have increased their focus and investment on data collection and analysis to guide decisions and leave no on behind. The first anniversary of the adoption of the SDGs is an opportunity to celebrate all achievements made, to do more to make SDGs a reality and most importantly to thank the governements, businesses, civil society groups and young people around the world for all their efforts.”

Sir Ken Robinson, author, speaker and international advisor on education, said:  "The Global Goals are an enormous opportunity for positive and creative change. We have to continue to raise everyone’s awareness of them and especially excite the curiosity of children and young people. Of course we need the support of world leaders but global change also has to come from the ground up. The World’s Largest Lesson and The Global Goals campaign are taking a creative approach to inspiring this kind of action and I’m proud and excited to continue my work with them this year.”  

Richard Curtis, Writer, Director, & SDG Advocate, said: “Every year counts in trying to achieve the high ambitions of the new Goals.  I am encouraged that a series of traditions is starting – Awards for people working for the Goals, the World’s Largest Lesson, the Social Good Summit, the Global Citizen Festival and mobile show, focusing on the Goals and most important, a special session at the UN itself – all of which which adds to the pressure on all of us to work towards fulfilling the SDGs.”

Kathy Calvin, President and Chief Executive Officer of the United Nations Foundation, said: “This week is not just about the numbers.  It's about what the numbers can do when they come together around real solutions for real people.  What kicks off with the Global Goals week announcement at the Social Good Summit will include important moments where the UN and partners are coming together around tangible, scalable solutions for progress.  The Solutions Summit on September 21st is a good example of how much energy and creativity is coming around these goals. It's a smart approach that puts numbers to work and helps turn words into action.”

Media ASSETS

Plan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lesuDcxitg8

#WhatIReallyReallyWant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSf-SBUwYwc

Global Goals channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRfuAYy7MesZmgOi1Ezy0ng

ICONS GIFS: https://wdrv.it/acc540c10

For further information, please contact:

Lottie Dodson

freuds

Tel: +44 7825 707145

Email: lottie.dodson@freuds.com

Notes to Editors:

SDG Year 1 key achievements

Read More

Forest Whitaker and Andrea Bocelli join Ban Ki-moon at the UND to shine a spotlight on progress of the global goals, one year on

Forest Whitaker and Andrea Bocelli join Ban Ki-moon at the UN to shine a spotlight on progress of the global goals, one year on

Sep 16, 2016

  • Partners; the United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Foundation, SDG Action Campaign and Project Everyone come together for the inaugural Global Goals Week
  • UN Secretary General, PGA, Special Adviser for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, DPI and SDG Advocates including Forest Whitaker, Andrea Bocelli, Dr. Alaa Murabit and Richard Curtis call on all world leaders to implement the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030
  • Global Girls bus will tour New York, blasting messages from women and girls around the world from the #whatireallyreallywant campaign

Next week will mark the first anniversary of the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, signed by 193 world leaders on 25th September 2015 at the UN General Assembly. In the 7 days following, news of these Global Goals reached 40% of the world’s population, around 3 billion people.   

This year in order to keep up momentum and ensure all 17 Goals are achieved, the UN and partners from around the world are launching #GlobalGoals Week - an annual week of action, awareness and accountability for Sustainable Development. At the centre of this week will be ‘SDG Year 1’, a special session at the UNGA Opening which will call on all world leaders to implement the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 and mark progress in 2016.  It will include films, produced by writer, film-maker and SDG Advocate Richard Curtis, and feature SDG Advocates Forest Whitaker, Andrea Bocelli, Dr. Alaa Murabit, the President of the General Assembly Peter Thomson and the UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon.

Throughout the week, UNDP, UN Foundation, SDG Action Campaign and Project Everyone, the founding partners of #GlobalGoals Week, will work with events and organisations such as the Social Good Summit, Global Citizen Festival, the office of the Special Adviser for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the World’s Largest Lesson and UNICEF, Leave No-One Behind partnership, Global Compact, Every Women Every Child, GSMA, the UN Department of Public Information and many more to promote action, accountability and awareness of the Goals. So this September starts the countdown for the next 14 years to ensure no one is left behind.

As part of #GlobalGoals Week and in the year Girl Power went Global, the messages from people around the world inspired by the film #WhatIReallyReallyWant, will be brought to NYC as world leaders gather. Issues like quality education, an end to violence, an end to child marriage and equal pay for equal work need to be top of every governments’ agenda in order to give the Goals the best possible start. With 110 million views, 40 million impressions on Twitter and global media coverage, produced by MJ Delaney and supported by original Spice Girl, Victoria Beckham and Mel C, the film inspired an overwhelming response on social media with people from all over the world sharing images of what they really want for girls and women. These messages will be brought to New York on a Global Girls bus with performers from the video and influential women at key events and moments throughout the week.

#GlobalGoals Week: 18th – 24th of September 2016

10 #GLOBALGOALS WEEK EVENTS IN NEW YORK  

  1. SDG Year 1 at the UNGA Opening Session – A unique SDG accountability moment including films, produced by writer, film-maker and SDG Advocate Richard Curtis, and featuring SDG Advocates Forest Whitaker, Andrea Bocelli and Dr. Alaa Murabit, the President of the General Assembly Peter Thomson and the UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon. This moment will call on all world leaders at the UN General Assembly to implement the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 and mark progress in 2016.  
  2. The Young Leaders Initiative - launched by the Office of the UN Secretary General’s Envoy on Youth, is announcing 17 Young Leaders (19–30) and champions for the SDGs recognized for their leadership and contribution to a more sustainable world, and representing every region in the world.
  3. The Social Good Summit -  will launch Global Goals Week with UNDP’s Helen Clark, the UN Foundation’s Kathy Calvin, Mashable’s Pete Cashmore, the 92nd Street Y’s Henry Timms and Yusra & Sarah Mardini from Syria. UNDP will spread the word of the Goals to over 80 countries including Yemen, Iran, N. Korea and Iraq. 
  4. UN Global Compact Private Sector Forum – 350 CEOs, government leaders, UN agencies and civil society will come come together to focus on the role of business in advancing sustainable development to prevent global instability. 
  5. Global Goals Awards Dinner – in partnership with the SDG Advocates, Unilever and UNICEF focusing on Global Girls and giving awards to those who have helped make progress towards Girl Goals. This will be the first annual dinner to mark accountability for the Sustainable Development Goals, and will call on all sectors – from the public, to civil society, government, media and business - to do more, and work together to achieve their implementation over the next 14 years.                 
  6. Solutions Summit – a summit highlighting projects and creative solutions advancing the achievements of the Global Goals
  7. Global Citizen Festival – The fifth Global Citizen Festival will focus on the achievement of the SDGs, bringing together musicians including Rihanna, Coldplay and Ellie Goulding, celebrities and world leaders in an effort to enact major policy commitments toward the issues of girls’ and women’s equality, education, health, water and sanitation, environment, finance and innovation, and food and hunger.
  8. The World’s Largest Lesson – in partnership with UNICEF has reached 160 countries since launch, and in 2016 is launching in India with Bollywood Actress Sonam Kapoor and youth organisations in 120 countries sending volunteers to teach lessons to younger children.    
  9. The Global Goals Mobile Campaign 2016 - includes an official SDG Action app produced by the GSMA, Project Everyone and DPI, participation of 17 mobile operator groups with 2 billion customers being asked to support the campaign, and 900 million people receiving a Global Goals text message. A live Mobile Show featuring the best of Global Goals week and in partnership with Global Citizen, will be made free to view on mobile, and a fun interactive feature will enable millions to text Mr. Bean and world leaders about what they love most in their world.
  10. The Global Girls Bus – As leaders attend a Special Session inside the UN Chamber on the SDGs, a Global Girls bus will begin a loud tour of New York, ensuring the messages received from women and girls around the world this year from the #WhatIReallyReallyWant campaign are heard loud and clear. The bus will bring together performers from the #WhatIReallyReallyWant video with leading women’s rights activists and public figures to shout about the progress that still needs to be made for women and girls.

Helen Clark, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme, said: "The UN has an ambitious agenda to end poverty, fix climate change, and address inequalities over 15 years. Now we need everyone to help make this a reality. Everyone needs to know about the Goals, and every September when world leaders gather for the opening of the UN General Assembly, we must emphasize the importance of delivery on the promises of the Sustainable Development Goals."

Forest Whitaker, Actor, Director, Producer and SDG Advocate said: "Our collective commitment to the 17 Global Goals is our most important defense in ensuring that the benefits of our modernizing world are shared among all nations and people and not just by the privileged few. These goals are intended to serve the interest of every woman, man, and child on our planet. And that means that achieving these goals is up to all of us. This has to be an international movement—a coming together of people and a rallying around a common cause on a scale. I believe we have the tools and the passion to make the Global Goals a reality."

David Nabarro, Special Adviser to the Secretary General for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Climate Change said: “In this first year anniversary – “SDG Year 1” – more than 50 governments, and also numerous businesses, scientists and civil society organizations have stepped up their efforts to make the SDGs a central framework for their policies and actions, and have increased their focus and investment on data collection and analysis to guide decisions and leave no on behind. The first anniversary of the adoption of the SDGs is an opportunity to celebrate all achievements made, to do more to make SDGs a reality and most importantly to thank the governements, businesses, civil society groups and young people around the world for all their efforts.”

Sir Ken Robinson, author, speaker and international advisor on education, said:  "The Global Goals are an enormous opportunity for positive and creative change. We have to continue to raise everyone’s awareness of them and especially excite the curiosity of children and young people. Of course we need the support of world leaders but global change also has to come from the ground up. The World’s Largest Lesson and The Global Goals campaign are taking a creative approach to inspiring this kind of action and I’m proud and excited to continue my work with them this year.”  

Richard Curtis, Writer, Director, & SDG Advocate, said: “Every year counts in trying to achieve the high ambitions of the new Goals.  I am encouraged that a series of traditions is starting – Awards for people working for the Goals, the World’s Largest Lesson, the Social Good Summit, the Global Citizen Festival and mobile show, focusing on the Goals and most important, a special session at the UN itself – all of which which adds to the pressure on all of us to work towards fulfilling the SDGs.”

Kathy Calvin, President and Chief Executive Officer of the United Nations Foundation, said: “This week is not just about the numbers.  It's about what the numbers can do when they come together around real solutions for real people.  What kicks off with the Global Goals week announcement at the Social Good Summit will include important moments where the UN and partners are coming together around tangible, scalable solutions for progress.  The Solutions Summit on September 21st is a good example of how much energy and creativity is coming around these goals. It's a smart approach that puts numbers to work and helps turn words into action.”

Media ASSETS

Plan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lesuDcxitg8

#WhatIReallyReallyWant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSf-SBUwYwc

Global Goals channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRfuAYy7MesZmgOi1Ezy0ng

ICONS GIFS: https://wdrv.it/acc540c10

For further information, please contact:

Lottie Dodson

freuds

Tel: +44 7825 707145

Email: lottie.dodson@freuds.com

Notes to Editors:

SDG Year 1 key achievements

  • Over 50 countries have already integrated these new Goals into their national planning – and 22 presented their plans in detail at the High Level Political Forum.
  • At the Paris climate conference in December 2015, 195 countries adopted the first-ever universal, legally binding global climate deal – which has now been officially ratified by 27 countries.
  • Great strides are being made towards making child marriage a thing of the past - with Gambia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania declaring it illegal. 
  • The Global Fund is about to announce substantial replenishment in the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.   This money is expected to save an extra 8 million lives – and this comes at the same time as the announcement that Sri Lanka has become totally malaria free.
  • And to chart and analyse the progress on the Goals an Interactive Executive Agency has been created to accelerate the collection and dissemination of quality Data about all 17 of the SDGs.
  • The United Nations is engaging one million people to be activated so that they are in a position to promote the SDGs, and through them, two billion people to know about them and appreciate their significance all by the end of 2017.
  • The agenda encourages all stakeholders to be accountable for their actions in relation to the Agenda, and all people everywhere to call stakeholders to account.
  • Activities underway on climate change, risk reduction, humanitarian action, mass migration, women’s empowerment, involvement of less-able people and financing for development all connect into the 2030 Agenda.  It has an explicit commitment to ensuring that the people hardest to reach can access essential services and that planetary renewal focus on the most essential actions needed.

About Project Everyone and the Global Goals campaign

Project Everyone was devised by filmmaker and campaigner, Richard Curtis and founded Gail Gallie and Kate Garvey to make the Global Goals famous, so that they stand the greatest chance of being achieved.

In order to achieve the enormous reach over the 7 days following the agreement of the Goals, success was driven by: creation of the logo and icons for the Goals in partnership with Jakob Trollback, texts sent to 925 million people, radio programmes in 75 countries on 700 stations, millions of school children in 160 countries receiving a lesson on the goals and why they matter, a 1-hour TV programme shown in over 150 countries, homepage takeovers of Google, YouTube, Baidu, MSN, Bing and many others and significant advertising presence with 140,000 poster sites around the world, and a film shown in cinemas in 35 countries.

In July 2016 Project Everyone focused on Girls and Women because Goals Progress equals Girls Progress. 20 years on, it released a remake of the Spice Girls’ Wannabe video, featuring artists from India, Nigeria, South Africa, UK, USA and Canada, to tell world leaders what girls and women really really want i

Cannot serve request to /content/undp/en/home/presscenter/pressreleases/2016/09/16/forest-whitaker-and-andrea-bocelli-join-ban-ki-moon-at-the-und-to-shine-a-spotlight-on-progress-of-the-global-goals-one-year-on.html on this server


ApacheSling/2.2 (Day-Servlet-Engine/4.1.52, Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM 1.8.0_73, Linux 4.4.19-29.55.amzn1.x86_64 amd64)
Read More

IAEA Scientific Forum 2016: Atoms for People, Planet and Prosperity

Since the 1930s, various peaceful applications of nuclear technology have helped countries achieve their development priorities. This year's IAEA Scientific Forum - Nuclear Technology for the Sustainable Development Goals – will bring together experts and scientists on 28 and 29 September to showcase how nuclear techniques are used to improve human and animal health, boost prosperity and protect the planet. 

This article summarizes the sessions, which will also be livestreamed on iaea.org. For the full programme, see the Scientific Forum page. Watch our videos on nuclear science for sustainable development.

Opening Session

IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano will open the event. After his remarks, political leaders, decision makers and leading scientists will share their views on how nuclear science and technology can help the global community achieve the sustainable development agenda by 2030.

Keynote speakers include:

  • His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco
  • Andrew Wheatley, Minister of Science, Energy and Technology, Jamaica
  • Abdeladim Lhafi, High Commissioner for Water and Forests and the Fight against Desertification and Commissioner General of COP 22, Morocco
  • Yiren Wang, Vice Chairman, China Atomic Energy Authority
  • Alan Finkel, Chief Scientist, Australia

Session 1: Health and Well-being: Global Access to Radiation Medicine

Battling non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is one of the major health challenges of our time. NCDs such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases claim 38 million lives per year, accounting for 63 per cent of all deaths worldwide, most of which occur in developing countries. Cardiovascular diseases alone cause 17.3 million deaths per year, a number that is expected to grow to more than 23.6 million by 2030.

Participants in this session will discuss how radiation medicine can contribute to achieving the ambitious target under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to reduce deaths from NCDs by a third by 2030. Discussions will start off with an overview of the key findings from the Lancet Oncology Commission Report on how to expand global access to radiotherapy and give a concrete example from Zimbabwe – a country where only two radiotherapy facilities serve a population of over 13 million. The session will also explore the potential of nuclear medicine for treating cardiovascular diseases, and look at what is needed to increase sustainable access to crucial medical equipment and services.

Session 2: Zero Hunger: Atoms for Food, Agriculture and Nutrition

The United Nations Development Programme reports that over the past 20 years the number of undernourished people has dropped by almost half thanks to rapid economic growth and increased agricultural productivity. However, still a lot needs to be done to achieve zero hunger by 2030. Enhancing food security, improving nutrition and tackling agricultural challenges related to, for example, climate change and harmful pests, are pivotal to ending hunger, eradicating poverty and achieving many of the 17 SDGs. 

The afternoon session will illustrate the numerous ways nuclear techniques can boost food security. We will first hear from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations on the challenge of ending hunger by 2030. Following this presentation, four world-renowned experts from three different continents will give concrete examples of how nuclear techniques have made a difference in their countries, for instance by improving rice varieties in Bangladesh and cattle health in Botswana, making food safer in Argentina and enhancing diet quality in Thailand.

Session 3: Energy for the Future: The Role of Nuclear Power

Energy drives economies, creates jobs and boosts prosperity, but its production is also the main contributor to climate change, accounting for around two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions. Addressing energy poverty and growing energy needs, while mitigating climate change is no easy task.

Nuclear power, one of the lowest-carbon technologies available to generate electricity, can be part of the solution – this will be the theme of the morning debate on the second day of the Forum.  World-renowned experts will discuss how innovation, technology and smart financial models could address common concerns related to nuclear power, such as safety, cost and waste. Panellists will discuss how expanding nuclear energy could contribute to mitigating climate change, ensuring access to clean and affordable energy, and boosting industrial output at the same time.

Session 4: Isotopes for the Environment: Managing our Natural Resources

Protecting our natural resources is a must. Over 3 billion people depend on marine biodiversity for their livelihoods and 2.6 billion depend directly on agriculture.

This session will begin with a presentation about environmental challenges in Fiji – a country of more than 300 islands. We will then hear from an Australian expert on how his country has addressed similar problems with nuclear techniques. Moving from oceans to other water resources, the following presentation will provide an overview of how radiation technology is used to treat industrial wastewater in India. We will then learn how Sudan uses nuclear techniques to determine when and how much water is required for each crop to maximize yields and improve water use efficiency, and how this knowledge has empowered women farmers in eastern Sudan to step out of poverty.

Session 5: Partnerships for Progress: Transferring Nuclear Science and Technology

Building partnerships and capacity, sharing knowledge and transferring science and technology will be crucial in achieving development in a sustainable manner. The speakers in this session will share their experiences and give advice on how to ensure the long-term transfer of the multiple benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology between continents, countries, sectors and organizations.

Interested in finding out more? Join us on 28-29 September 2016 at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna or watch the Forum online!

Read More

Motion for a resolution on the EU strategic objectives for the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), to be held in Johannesburg (South Africa) from 24 September to 5 October 2016 – B8-2016-0987

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the seriousness of the decline in global biodiversity, which represents the sixth mass extinction of species,

–  having regard to the role of forests and tropical forests, which are the world’s largest reservoir of terrestrial biodiversity and an essential habitat for wild fauna and flora and for indigenous populations,

–  having regard to the forthcoming 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP 17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), to be held from 24 September to 5 October 2016 in Johannesburg (South Africa),

–  having regard to UN General Assembly (UNGA) Resolution 69/314 on tackling illicit trafficking in wildlife, adopted on 30 July 2015,

–  having regard to the questions of xxx to the Council and to the Commission on key objectives for the Conference of the Parties to CITES in Johannesburg (South Africa) from 24 September to 5 October 2016 (O-00088/2016 – B8‑0711/2016 and O‑00089/2016 – B8‑0712/2016),

–  having regard to Rules 128(5) and 123(2) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas CITES is the largest global wildlife conservation agreement in existence, with 181 parties, including the EU and its 28 Member States;

B.  whereas the aim of CITES is to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants is not a threat to the survival of the species in the wild;

C.  whereas, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species, more than 23 000 species, representing about 30 % of the 79 837 species assessed by IUCN, are threatened with extinction;

D.  whereas tropical rainforests contain 50 to 80 % of terrestrial animal and plant species; whereas today these environments are particularly under threat, including from the commercialisation of species, in particular the exploitation of tropical timber and subsoils; whereas deforestation and the illegal sale of wood are having a disastrous impact on the preservation of forest flora and fauna;

E.  whereas intensive fishing, commercial hunting and the unrestricted exploitation of micro-organisms and sub-seabed resources are harming marine biodiversity;

F.  whereas many species subject to trophy hunting are suffering a serious population decline; whereas over a 10-year period EU Member States declared as hunting trophies imports of almost 117 000 specimens of wildlife species listed in the CITES appendices;

G.  whereas wildlife trafficking has become an organised transnational crime which has major negative impacts on biodiversity and on the livelihood of local populations, as it denies them a legal income, creating insecurity and instability;

H.  whereas wildlife trafficking has become the fourth largest black market, after the drugs, people and arms markets; whereas the internet has come to play a key role in facilitating wildlife trafficking; whereas terrorist groups also use the above types of trafficking to finance their operations; whereas wildlife trafficking offences are not punished severely enough;

I.  whereas corruption plays a central role in wildlife trafficking;

J.  whereas evidence suggests that wild-caught specimens are being laundered through the fraudulent use of CITES permits and claims of captive breeding;

K.  whereas the EU is a major transit and destination market for illegal wildlife trade, especially for the trade in birds, turtles, reptiles and plant species(1) that are listed in CITES appendices;

L.  whereas a growing number of illegally traded exotic species are kept as pets in Europe and internationally; whereas the escape of these animals can lead to an uncontrolled spread affecting the environment and public health and safety;

M.  whereas the EU and its Member States provide substantial financial and logistical support for CITES, and for tackling illegal wildlife trade in many third countries;

N.  whereas the species under CITES are listed in appendices according to their conservation status and levels of international trade, Appendix I containing species threatened with extinction for which commercial trade is prohibited, and Appendix II species in which trade must be controlled in order to avoid utilisation incompatible with their survival;

O.  whereas CITES Appendix I species are strongly protected, whereas any commercial trade in species listed therein is prohibited, and whereas any permit to sell confiscated specimens or products (for example ivory, tiger products or rhino horn) would undermine the aim of the CITES Convention;

P.  whereas efforts to improve transparency in decision-making are essential;

1.  Welcomes the EU’s accession to CITES; considers the accession to be a fundamental step in ensuring that the EU can further pursue the wider objectives of its environmental policies and the regulation of the international trade in endangered species of wild flora and fauna, and promote the sustainable development policies of the UN Agenda 2030;

2.  Welcomes in particular the fact that the EU is participating for the first time as a party, and supports the proposals made by the EU and its Member States, in particular the proposed resolutions on corruption and on hunting trophies, the extension of CITES protection to a number of species imported into the EU, notably as pets, and the proposed amendments to Resolution 13.7 (Rev. CoP14) on the control of trade in personal and household effects;

3.  Highlights the fact that the accession to CITES by the European Union has rendered the legal status of the European Union in CITES more transparent vis-à-vis third parties to the Convention; believes that it is a logical and necessary step to ensure that the European Union is fully able to pursue its objectives under its environmental policy; recalls that accession enables the Commission, on behalf of the European Union, to express a coherent EU position in CITES matters and play a substantial role in negotiations during the Conferences of Parties;

4.  Stresses that the European Union became a party to CITES in 2015 and that it will be voting with 28 votes on issues of EU competence at the CITES CoP; in that regard, supports changes to the CoP’s Rules of Procedure which reflect the text of the CITES Convention on voting by regional economic integration organisations and which are consistent with what has been in place in other international agreements for many years, and objects to having the votes by the European Union calculated on the basis of the number of Member States that are properly accredited for the meeting at the time the actual vote occurs;

5.  Welcomes the recently adopted EU Action Plan against wildlife trafficking, which aims to prevent such trafficking by addressing its principal causes, improving the implementation and enforcement of existing rules, and combating organised wildlife crime more effectively; welcomes the inclusion in the Action Plan of a specific chapter on strengthening the global partnership of source, consumer, and transit countries against wildlife trafficking; and urges the EU and its Member States to adopt and implement the strengthened Action Plan, which will demonstrate a strong European commitment to tackling wildlife trafficking;

6.  Supports the initiative by the Commission and the Member States to agree on global guidelines on trophy hunting within CITES in order to better control internationally the sustainable origin of hunting trophies of the species listed in Appendix I or II;

7.  Calls on the EU and its Member States to adhere to the precautionary principle with regard to species protection in all their decisions on working documents and listing proposals (as set out in CITES Resolution Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP16)) – in particular regarding the import of hunting trophies of CITES species – taking account, in particular, of the user-pays principle, the principle of preventive action and the ecosystem approach; calls on the EU and its Member States, furthermore, to promote the removal of exemptions for permits for all hunting trophies from CITES-listed species;

8.  Demands that all CITES/CoP 17 decisions be based on science, careful analysis and equitable consultation with the affected range states, and be reached in cooperation with the local communities; underlines that any wildlife regulation should incentivise the rural population’s engagement in nature protection by linking their benefit with the state of biodiversity;

9.  Encourages CITES Parties to strengthen cooperation, coordination and synergies between biodiversity-related conventions at all relevant levels;

10.  Calls on the Member States to provide for cooperation, coordination and a prompt exchange of information among all relevant agencies involved in implementing the CITES Convention, in particular the customs authorities, the police, border veterinary and plant health inspection services, and other bodies;

11.  Encourages the EU and its Member States to promote and support initiatives to increase protection against the impact of international trade on species for which the European Union is a significant transit or destination market;

12.  Is concerned that the boundary between legal and illegal trade is very thin as regards the commercialisation of species and their derived products, and that with the cumulative effects of human activity and global warming the great majority of wild fauna and flora species are today threatened with extinction;

13.  Urges the EU to adopt legislation to reduce illegal trade by making it illegal to import, export, sell, acquire or buy wild animals or plants which are taken, possessed, transported or sold in violation of the law of the country of origin or transit;

14.  Commits particularly to strongly encouraging all the Member States: to ban the export of raw ivory, as already do Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom and some US States; to increase their vigilance with regard to marketing certificates on their territory; to make the fight against fraud effective, in particular at borders; to launch destruction operations of illegal ivory; and to strengthen the penalties for trafficking in protected species (notably elephants, rhinos, tigers, primates and varieties of tropical wood);

15.  Encourages the EU and its Member States, and the wider CITES Parties, further to Articles III, IV and V of the Convention, to promote and support initiatives to improve the welfare of live CITES-listed animals in trade; such initiatives include mechanisms to ensure animals are ‘prepared and shipped so as to minimise the risk of injury, damage to health or cruel treatment’, that destinations are ‘suitably equipped to house and care for them’, and that confiscations of live specimens are undertaken with due consideration for their welfare;

16.  Is concerned about the impact that ‘banking on extinction’, or the buying of products in the hope that the species concerned will soon be extinct, might have on the protection of endangered wildlife; invites the CITES Parties and Secretariat to carry out further research on whether emerging financial products and technologies such as bitcoin play an enabling role;

17.  Recognises that CITES observers play an important role in providing expertise on species and trade, and in lending their support to capacity-building by the Parties;

Transparency of decision-making

18.  Considers that transparency in decision-making in international environmental institutions is key to their effective functioning; welcomes all voluntary and procedural efforts to increase transparency in CITES governance; strongly opposes the use of secret ballots as a general practice within CITES;

19.  Welcomes the decision made at COP 16 to include a requirement for members of the Animals and Plants Committees to provide declarations of any conflicts of interest; acknowledges, however, that the requirement is based only on a self-assessment by members; regrets that there have been no declarations of any potential financial conflicts of interest from members of these committees so far;

20.  Urges the CITES Secretariat to investigate the potential for an independent review board, or the expansion of the mandate of the Standing Committee to include an independent review panel, in order to create an oversight safeguard for the conflict of interest provisions;

21.  Considers transparency imperative to any funding process and a requisite for good governance, and therefore supports the resolution proposed by the EU on the ‘Sponsored Delegates Project’(2);

Reporting

22.  Considers traceability essential for legal and sustainable trade, whether commercial or non-commercial, and also central to the EU’s efforts to fight corruption and wildlife trafficking and poaching, which is recognised to be the fourth largest illicit market on the planet; in this regard highlights the need for the implementation by all Parties of the e-permitting system, which should be organised transparently and jointly by all of them; acknowledges, however, the technical challenges faced by some Parties in doing so, and encourages the provision of capacity-building support to enable the implementation of the e-permitting system by all the Parties;

23.  Welcomes the decision made at COP 16 on regular reporting by CITES Parties on illegal trade; regards the new annual illegal trade report format, as included in CITES Notification No 2016/007, as a significant step towards developing a better understanding of wildlife trafficking, and encourages all CITES Parties to accurately and regularly report on illegal trade using the prescribed format;

24.  Welcomes private-sector initiatives such as those taken by the International Air Transport Association on e-freight for and by the air cargo supply chain; considers the expansion of such traceability initiatives, especially for the transport sector, to be an important tool in intelligence-gathering;

25.  Highlights the importance of the permit-issuing process in effective data-collection, and thus the key role played by the Management Authorities; reiterates that permit-issuing authorities must be independent, in accordance with Article VI of CITES;

Wildlife trafficking and corruption

26.  Draws attention to cases of corruption where deliberate fraudulent issuing of permits by actors in the permit-issuing authority has occurred; calls on the CITES Secretariat and the Standing Committee to address these cases as a matter of priority and urgency;

27.  Underlines that corruption can be detected at every stage in the wildlife trade chain, affecting countries of origin, transit and destination, and undermining the effectiveness, proper implementation and ultimate success of the CITES Convention; considers, therefore, that strong and effective anti-corruption measures are essential in the fight against wildlife trafficking;

28.  Raises serious concerns over the deliberate misuse of source codes for the illegal trade in wild-caught specimens in the form of fraudulently use of captive-bred codes for CITES species; calls on COP 17 to adopt a robust system for recording, monitoring and certifying trade in ranched or captive-bred species, in both countries of origin and the EU, in order to prevent this abuse;

29.  Urges the CITES Parties to develop further guidance and to support the development of additional techniques and methodologies to differentiate between species originating from captive production facilities and species from the wild;

30.  Condemns the high degree of illegal activity by organised criminal gangs and networks in violation of the Convention, which frequently use corruption to facilitate wildlife trafficking and frustrate efforts to enforce the law;

31.  Urges the Parties that are not yet signatories to, or have not yet ratified, the UN Convention on Transnational Organised Crime and the UN Convention against Corruption to do so without delay;

32.  Welcomes the international commitment under UNGA Resolution 69/314 (July 2015), inter alia on counter-corruption (Article 10)(3);

33.  Supports EU and Member State initiatives that call for more action in the global fight against corruption under CITES; urges the Parties to CITES to support the EU proposal for a resolution against corruption-facilitating activities conducted in violation of the Convention;

Enforcement

34.  Calls for the timely and full use of sanctions by CITES against Parties that do not comply with key aspects of the Convention, and in particular for the EU and its Member States to make use of the mechanisms available to encourage Parties to comply with the CITES Convention and other international agreements aimed at protecting wildlife and biodiversity;

35.  Underlines the importance of joint international cooperation between all actors in the enforcement chain, in order to strengthen law enforcement capacities at the local, regional, national and international levels; welcomes their contribution, and calls for even more engagement; points to the importance of setting up special prosecutors’ offices and specialised police squads to fight wildlife trafficking more effectively; highlights the importance of joint international enforcement operations under the ICCWC(4), congratulates in this respect the successful COBRA III operation(5); welcomes the EU support for the ICCWC;

36.  Acknowledges the increasing illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products via the internet, and calls on the CITES Parties to liaise with law enforcement and cybercrime units and the International Consortium on Combating Wildlife Crime in order to identify best practices and model domestic measures to tackle illegal online trade;

37.  Calls on the Parties to adopt and implement clear and effective policies to discourage the consumption of products derived from vulnerable wildlife species, to raise consumer awareness of the impact of their consumption on wild species and to inform on the dangers of the illegal trafficking networks;

38.  Calls on the Parties to support the development of livelihoods for the local communities closest to the wildlife concerned and to involve these communities in the fight against poaching and in the provision of information on the effects of the trade in species of fauna and flora threatened with extinction;

39.  Asks for continuing international engagement in order to facilitate long-term capacity building, to improve the exchange of information and intelligence and to coordinate the enforcement efforts of government authorities;

40.  Calls on the Parties to ensure effective prosecution of persons who commit offences related to wildlife and to ensure that they are punished in a manner commensurate with the seriousness of their actions;

Funding

41.  Points to the need to increase the funding being made available for wildlife conservation and capacity-building programmes;

42.  Stresses the need to allocate adequate resources to the CITES Secretariat, especially in view of its increased responsibilities and additional workload; also stresses the need for the timely deposit of financial contributions pledged by the Parties to CITES;

43.  Encourages the Parties to consider increasing the core budget of CITES to reflect inflation and to ensure the proper functioning of the CITES Convention;

44.  Encourages the extension of public-private partnership financing for capacity-building programmes to other areas of the CITES Convention framework, as well as of direct funding, in order to support the implementation of the Convention;

45.  Welcomes the EU funding provided for the CITES Convention through the European Development Fund, and encourages the EU to continue to provide and ensure targeted financial support and, in the long term too, to continue to support specific and targeted financial aid;

Amendments to the CITES Appendices

46.  Expresses its strong support for the listing proposals submitted by the EU and its Member States;

47.  Urges all Parties to CITES and all participants in COP 17 to respect the criteria laid down in the Convention for the inclusion of species in the appendices, and to adopt a precautionary approach in order to ensure a high and efficient level of protection of endangered species; observes that the credibility of CITES depends on its ability to alter listings in response to negative trends as well as positive ones, and therefore welcomes the possibility of downlisting of species only when it is appropriate, in accordance with established scientific criteria, providing evidence that the CITES listing functions well;

African elephant and ivory trade

48.  Notes that with the doubling of illegal killing and the tripling of the quantity of ivory seized over the past decade, the crisis faced by the African elephant (Loxondonta africana) as a result of poaching for the ivory trade remains devastating and is leading to a decline in populations across Africa, and is a threat to the livelihood of millions of people, given that the illegal ivory trade harms economic development, fosters organised crime, promotes corruption, fuels conflicts and threatens regional and national security by providing militia groups with a source of funding; urges the EU and its Member States, therefore, to support proposals that would strengthen the protection of African elephants and reduce the illegal trade in ivory;

49.  Welcomes the proposal submitted by Benin, Burkina Faso, the Central African Republic, Chad, Kenya, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sri Lanka and Uganda and endorsed by the African Elephant Coalition that seeks to list all the elephant populations of Africa in Annex I, which would simplify the implementation of the ban on international trade in ivory and would send a clear message to the world regarding the global determination to prevent the extinction of African elephants;

50.  Calls on the EU and all Parties to maintain the current moratorium and hence to oppose the proposals made by Namibia and Zimbabwe on the ivory trade, which seek to remove restrictions on trade associated with the annotations to the Appendix II listing of those parties’ elephant populations;

51.  Observes that attempts by CITES to reduce poaching and illegal trade by permitting legal ivory sales have failed and that ivory trafficking has increased significantly; calls for further efforts by the parties concerned under the National Ivory Action Plan process; supports measures for the management and destruction of ivory stockpiles;

52.  Recalls the call made in Parliament’s resolution of 15 January 2014 on wildlife crime on all 28 of its Member States to introduce moratoria on all commercial imports, exports and domestic sales and purchases of tusks and raw and worked ivory products until wild elephant populations are no longer threatened by poaching; notes that Germany, France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Austria, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Denmark have already decided to not grant any export permits for pre-Convention ‘raw’ ivory; encourages the EU and its Member States, therefore, to ban the export and import of ivory and prohibit all commercial sales and purchases of ivory within the EU;

White rhino

53.  Regrets the proposal made by Swaziland to legalise trade in rhino-horn from its white rhino population (Ceratotherium simum simum), which would facilitate the laundering of poached rhino-horn into legal trade, undermining existing demand reduction efforts and domestic trade bans in consumer markets, and might fuel poaching of rhino populations in Africa and Asia; urges the EU and all Parties to oppose this proposal, and consequently calls on Swaziland to withdraw its proposal;

African lion

54.  Notes that while African lion (Panthera leo) populations have experienced a dramatic inferred decline of 43 % in 21 years and have recently been extirpated from 12 African States, international trade in lion products has increased significantly; urges the EU and all Parties to support the proposal by Niger, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, Rwanda and Togo to transfer all African lion populations to Appendix I of CITES;

Pangolins

55.  Observes that pangolins are the most illegally traded mammal in the world, for both their meat and their scales, which are used in traditional medicine, putting all eight species of pangolin (Manis crassicaudata, M. tetradactyla, M. tricuspis, M. gigantea, M. temminckii, M. javanica, M. pentadactyla, M. culionensis) at risk of extinction; welcomes, therefore, the various proposals for transferring all Asian and African pangolin species to Appendix I of CITES;

Tigers and other Asian big cats

56.  Urges the EU and all the Parties to support the adoption of decisions proposed by the CITES Standing Committee which lay down strict conditions for tiger farming and trading in captive tiger specimens and products, as well as the proposal made by India encouraging the Parties to share images of seized tiger specimens and products, which would assist law enforcement agencies with the identification of individual tigers by their unique stripe patterns; calls on the EU to consider providing funding for the implementation of these decisions, and calls for the closure of tiger farms and for an end to be put to the trade in captive tiger parts and products at the CITES COP 17;

Pet traded species

57.  Observes that the market for exotic pets is growing internationally and in the EU and that a large number of proposals have been submitted to list reptiles, amphibians, birds, fish and mammals that are threatened by international trade for the pet market; calls on all the Parties to support these proposals in order to ensure better protection for these endangered species from exploitation for the pet trade;

58.  Calls on the EU Member States to establish a positive list of exotic animals that can be kept as pets;

Agarwood and rosewood

59.  Acknowledges that illegal logging is one of the most destructive wildlife crimes, as it threatens not just single species but entire habitats, and that the demand for rosewood (Dalbergia spp.) for Asian markets has continued to increase; urges the EU and all the Parties to support the proposal by Argentina, Brazil, Guatemala and Kenya for the inclusion of the genus Dalbergia in CITES Appendix II, with the exception of the species included in Appendix I, as this will be a critical contribution to the efforts to halt unsustainable rosewood trade;

60.  Notes that the current exceptions to CITES requirements could allow resinous powder of agarwood (Aquilaria spp. and Gyrinops spp.) to be exported as exhausted powder, and other products to be packaged for retail sale before export, thus evading import regulations; calls, therefore, on the EU and all the Parties to support the United States of America’s proposal to amend the annotation in order to avoid loopholes for trade in this very valuable aromatic timber;

Other species

61.  Urges the EU and all the Parties:

–  to support the proposal from Peru to amend the annotation to Appendix II for the vicuña (Vicugna vicugna), as it will consolidate the marking requirements for the international trade in this species;

–  to support the inclusion of the nautilus (Nautilidae spp.) in Appendix II, as proposed by Fiji, India, Palau and the United States of America, given that the international trade in chambered nautilus shells as jewellery and decoration is a major threat to these biologically vulnerable species;

–  to oppose the proposal by Canada to move the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) from Appendix I to Appendix II, as this may exacerbate the significant illegal trade in the species;

62.  Recalls that the Banggai cardinalfish (Pterapogon kauderni) is on the IUCN list of endangered species and that a huge proportion of the species has been lost, including several entire populations, due to the continuing high demand for the aquarium trade, with main destinations being the European Union and the United States; calls on the European Union and its Member States, therefore, to support the inclusion of the Banggai cardinalfish in Appendix I rather than Appendix II;

63.  Notes that the international trade in raw and worked coral has expanded and that market demand for precious corals has increased, threatening the sustainability of precious corals; urges the European Union and all the Parties to support the adoption of the report on precious corals in international trade submitted by the United States;

64.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Parties to CITES and the CITES Secretariat.

Read More

Report – Economic Partnership Agreement between the EU and its Member States, of the one part, and the SADC EPA States, of the other part – A8-0242/2016 – Committee on International Trade

History of Economic Partnership Agreements

When the Cotonou Partnership Agreement was established in 2000, it called for fundamental changes in the longstanding non-reciprocal trade preferences that had governed the economic and political relationship between the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) and the European Union for almost 40 years. The main reason for this was that the impact of these unilateral preferences had been disappointing: firstly, the share of ACP trade in the EU market was continuously falling and most countries did not manage to use these preferences to diversify their economic structures. Secondly, the preferences were not compatible with the rules of the WTO, as they discriminated against non-ACP developing countries.

The EU and ACP agreed to negotiate reciprocal, though asymmetric trade agreements known as Economic Partnership Agreements. ACP countries themselves decided in which regional grouping they wanted to negotiate. Negotiations of Economic Partnership Agreements (EPA) started in 2002 and were expected to be concluded by the end of 2007, a date by which the WTO waiver would expire. Besides ensuring that ACP products would secure indefinite, duty free quota free market access to the EU, EPAs were mainly meant to be a development tool enabling ACP countries to deepen their own regional integration dynamics and to facilitate their integration into the global economy.

Today, all non-EPA states have the EU's "Generalised Scheme of Preferences" (GSP) or the “Everything But Arms” arrangement (EBA). However, for those countries that had concluded an interim EPA in 2007, in order to avoid market disruption and to allow the sufficient time to sign and ratify the agreement, the EU adopted a Market Access Regulation (MAR), Council Regulation (EC) No 1528/2007, as of 1st January 2008 – that enabled an advanced application of EPAs. It was later decided that the MAR treatment [free access to the EU] would expire on 1st October 2014 for countries that did not enter into a regional agreement or had not taken the necessary steps to implement their interim EPAs. Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland were among the MAR countries that did enter into a regional EPA before 1 October 2014, and the Commission duly adopted Delegated Acts keeping them on the MAR, while stating that they were expected to see through their commitment and ratify the regional EPA by 1 October 2016.

EU- Southern African Development Community (SADC) EPA

The SADC consists of 15 members. Seven of them started negotiating an EPA with the EU as the SADC EPA Group, namely Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland and South Africa. South Africa initially participated as an observer and in a supportive capacity but formally joined negotiations in 2007.

The core of the EU-SADC EPA is the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), the oldest customs union in the world. By joining this configuration, Mozambique and Angola intended to enhance their already strong economic and trade links with SACU. The other eight SADC Member States (Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Seychelles, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe) are part of other regional EPA configurations.

At the end of 2007, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mozambique and Namibia agreed an Interim region-to-region EPA with the EU. The interim EPA contains a clause allowing Angola and/or South Africa to join rapidly if they so wish. In the meantime Angola, being a Least Developed Country, maintains duty-free quota-free market access to the EU under the “Everything But Arms” initiative, while EU - South Africa trade is covered by the Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement (TDCA) signed in 1999.

Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland and Mozambique signed the interim EPA in June 2009. Although Namibia initialled the agreement more than nine years ago, they decided not to sign.

Both sides agreed to continue negotiations for a comprehensive regional EPA covering services, investment and trade-related rules. In fact in 2010, the interim EPA signatory countries suspended the process of ratification of the agreement, pending the conclusion of comprehensive regional negotiations.

On 15 July 2014, the EU concluded negotiations with six states of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) EPA Group, comprising Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland. Angola finally decided not to initial the agreement, but may join in the future pursuant to a specific accession clause in the agreement.

Regional integration and complexities

The SADC EPA Group is a very diverse group. The population of the six countries of the SADC EPA Group accumulates to some 100 million inhabitants, half of which live in South Africa. Their GDP according to figures provided by the World Bank in 2014 was 410 bln Euro, 85% of which was produced by South-Africa.

The group contains two least-developed countries (Lesotho and Mozambique) as well as one BRICS country (South Africa), which concluded a Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement (TDCA) with the EU in 1999. Without the EPA, their GDP levels would force Swaziland into GSP status and Botswana and Namibia would graduate to Most-Favoured Nation (MFN) status.

Five of the SADC EPA Group states are part of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU). Established in 1910, this is the oldest customs union in the world. Is also has a common external tariff. Mozambique is not part of SACU, but has long established trade and investment links with SACU.

In 2013, the EU imported goods in the value of 31 bln Euro from the SADC EPA Group while exporting goods in the value of 33 bln Euro to SADC. SADC exports to the EU are composed of oil 23% (from Angola), diamonds 11% (from Botswana), coal 12%, precious stones, metals and fish (Namibia), and sugar (from Swaziland).

2009 EP resolution on SADC EPA

In March 2009 the European Parliament voted a resolution on the SADC EU Interim EPA and called amongst others for:

•  A WTO conform EPA

•  duty free quota free access into EU market

•  support for existing regional integration (Southern African Customs Union, SACU)

•  phasing out of EU agricultural export subsidies

•  EU flexibility on export taxes, MFN clause and infant industry protection

•  simpler and improved rules of origin, promoting regional cumulation

•  the inclusion of a development cooperation chapter with increased and adequate assistance

•  importance of respect for ILO conventions

•  monitoring of implementation coordinated by the relevant parliamentary committee

Notably, the agreement never entered into force as it was signed but never ratified.

Key provisions in the EPA

Although this development-oriented regional trade agreement currently covers only merchandise trade, development-cooperation and trade and sustainable development provisions, it also leaves the door open to negotiate further provisions on services, investment, intellectual property, public procurement and enhanced stipulations on sustainable development.

The asymmetric nature of the agreement establishes a "positive discrimination" for the SADC EPA partners ensuring duty-free access to the EU market, at the same time reciprocally eliminating barriers to "substantially all the trade" and ensures WTO-compatibility, promoting regional integration, economic cooperation and good governance. EU will offer duty free quota free to five SADC countries, a continuation of present practice, but not disrupted through MAR amendment. Instead of offering unilateral preference, trade relations between SADC EPA countries and the EU are now stipulated in a contractual arrangement. Under progressive market opening provisions, SADC EPA countries will liberalise 86% of trade with the EU (Mozambique 74%) over a period of 10 years, excluding sensitive agricultural and fisheries products.

Promotion of regional integration

The EPA did not only avoid breaking up the oldest existing customs union in the world through the MAR amendment, but instead strengthened the SACU by harmonising South Africa to SACU, and brings Mozambique closer to SACU. The EU-SA TDCA used to de facto apply to the whole SACU as one legal entity. Its trade provisions will be replaced by an agreement which has been negotiated by all. Imports coming from the EU will be subject to a single external tariff.

The EPA also strengthens regional integration in various other ways, including through its Rules of origin regional cumulation possibilities, the openness to other SADC states (Angola) joining the EPA, and through institutional strengthening of SACU. The dispute settlement mechanism in the EPA builds on the DSM provisions from TDCA and will apply to all SADC EPA countries. In addition, common provisions on trade management (such as safeguards) and common decision making bodies will further strengthen the regional integration process.

Furthermore, "regional preference provisions" rule out a possibility for the SADC EPA countries to grant products originating in other SADC EPA countries a less favourable treatment than to those imported from the EU.

The parties commit to facilitate regional trade by boosting customs co-operation and by implementing reforms, in particular by harmonising and simplifying procedures and regulations in the SADC region, facilitating transit and fighting fraud.

Promotion of trade and development

There are several safeguards foreseen: multilateral safeguards, bilateral safeguards, agricultural safeguards as well as a transitional safeguard clause for a list of products originating from Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia and Swaziland (BLNS) to mitigate any potential negative impact in these countries.

As the use of agricultural export subsidies will no longer be allowed upon entry into force of the EPA, another key demand of SADC EPA countries was met.

Gradual lifting of tariffs on intermediates and inputs, such as fertilisers and machinery, will give a further boost to the value-addition process.

On services, the EPA contains a rendez-vous clause. Negotiations with limited number of SADC countries on services will continue. The rendez-vous clause gives the opportunity to implement provisions on services at a later stage, as it also does for public procurement and IPR.

An important Protocol on Geographic Indications between South Africa and the EU is included, which was a key demand of the EU. In total, 105 South African products (102 of which concern wines) and 251 products are covered by the protocol. The EU will protect South African names such as Rooibos and numerous wine names like Stellenbosch and Paarl.

A detailed chapter on development cooperation identifies trade-related areas that could benefit from EU financial support. Differently from the ECOWAS EPA however, which foresees a considerable financial envelope, there is no financial commitment made at this stage. Nevertheless, specific programmes from the national and regional indicative programmes for the DCI and the 11th EDF are scheduled to be funded in the context of the preparation and implementation of the EPA.

Policy space

In the EPA, the EU has shown flexibility allowing SADC EPA States to "grandfather" existing export duties and to apply new export taxes in exceptional circumstances in case of specific revenue needs, to promote infant industries or for environmental protection. Generally more room is provided for BLNS countries, but also some limited possibilities for South Africa on a limited number of products (8) if it can justify industrial development needs for maximum 12 years. That text allows SADC countries to benefit from raw materials.

A MFN clause was included, but will not automatically extend preferences to the EU. These extensions have to be examined first and would only apply to agreements with major trading countries. The MFN clause is only applicable to customs duties and fees, rules of origins are not included.

As described before many safeguards are foreseen, also to protect infant industries. Moreover, SADC had the possibility to exclude sensitive products from liberalisation.

Respect or values and monitoring the implementation of the agreement

The agreement contains a non-execution clause (Art 110.2), which provides the basis for taking 'appropriate measures' under the existing Cotonou Agreement if a Party fails to fulfil its obligations in respect to the fundamental principles in Article 2 of the Agreement. Suspension of trade benefits is one such measure even if this will be considered an action of last resort.

The first part of the EPA is devoted to sustainable development, which underlines the importance of these provisions. The parties reconfirm their obligations under international law, including ILO conventions, and commit themselves not to derogate from their environmental and labour laws. The EPA also establishes a consultation procedure for any environmental or labour matter. Dialogue on such issues may involve relevant authorities and stakeholders. The agreement defines a comprehensive list of areas in which the partners will cooperate to foster sustainable development.

Your rapporteur believes it is important to strengthen the monitoring provisions in the agreement. In Article 4, the parties agree to continuously monitor the operation and the impact of this agreement, “within their respective participative processes”, to make sure that its “benefits for the people” is maximised. Also a review of the agreement will take place every five years (Article 116). However the practical tools for this monitoring need to be strengthened. Pending establishment of the abovementioned sustainable-development dialogue and relevant participative processes for monitoring, the absence of a Joint Parliamentary Committee and a Joint Consultative Committee (which do exist in the Cariforum EPA, but are not part of the SADC EPA text) may be felt here, unless existing structures can be used (regional Joint Parliamentary Assembly meetings; EU-South Africa parliamentary committee, etc.). These omissions are regrettable and pragmatic solutions will need to be found to address this weakness.

Conclusion

Your rapporteur recommends giving consent to the SADC - EU Economic Partnership Agreement. This EPA has the potential to bring fundamental positive change and contribute to sustainable economic growth and deepened intra-regional trade and integration.

However, the trade and partnership agreement can only be a small part of a larger strategy. The SADC states should conduct trade and development-friendly domestic policies and pursue structural reforms. The regulatory framework that attracts investment is another element in the equation. These countries should also consider using the potential of the EPA by going beyond trade in goods only and also address services in the future. The EU should provide assistance in terms of capacity building and trade related assistance. The EP will need to monitor implementation and raise issues when appropriate. Appropriate monitoring structures need to be put in place to maximize the impact of the agreement.

Read More

Subcribe to my feed Follow on Twitter Like On Facebook Pinterest

Search News

Calendar

December 2018
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Zimbabwe Online News is an interactive website which compiles all form of news and press releases for the visitors.

Read More!

Archives