Home » General » US PROVIDING 15 MILLION USD AID FOR ZIMBABWE’S MATERNAL HEALTH SECTOR

HARARE, Feb 21– The United States government will provide 15 million US dollars in aid to help reduce the number of women and children dying during childbirth in Zimbabwe over the next three years, says US Ambassador to Zimbabwe Bruce Wharton.

Speaking at the closing of the US Agencyu for International Development (USAID) Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP) here Thursday, he said the US government was committed to saving the lives of Zimbabwean mothers, newborns and children through the provision of financial and technical support.

“While we celebrate the achievements that have been made by all, we recognize that the work to reduce maternal and child deaths is not over. We are excited to announce that the US government will extend its support to provide a further 15 million to MCHIP over the next three years,” he added.

Wharton said the US would also expand operations in an additional five districts in Manicaland Province.
In 2010, the US government provided more than 15 million USD to support maternal and child health activities over a three-year period.

Health and Child Care Minister Dr David Parirenyatwa said the Zimbabwe government remained committed to reducing the number of mothers and children dying at child birth. “We are scaling up our primary care nurses to midwifery to reduce deaths and we are carrying out audits of all health institutions to detect the causes of death,” he said.

Parirenyatwa commended the US government for its continued support towards the reduction of maternal and child deaths. “We cannot do it alone, we need your partnership,” he said.

Zimbabwe saw its annual Maternal Mortality Rate shooting up from 300 deaths per 100,000 births in 1990 to 960 deaths in 2010. To avert a potential disaster, Government launched the user fee policy where pregnant women and children under the age of five and senior citizens above 65 years can access free health care.

Source: NEW ZIANA

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