Home » General » Economic and Social Council Adopts Texts on Narcotic Drug Control, Human Rights, Technology for Development, as Coordination, Management Session Continues

Continuing its annual coordination and management segment, the Economic and Social Council today adopted a range of texts on such issues as narcotic drug control, human rights, and science and technology for development as it reviewed the work of its relevant subsidiary bodies and heard from senior officials on those topics.

The Council — acting without a vote on all the items before it today — adopted several drafts contained in the recent reports of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, including a resolution supporting the provision of “alternative development” interventions aimed at preventing, eliminating or reducing the cultivation of crops used for illicit drug production.  It also adopted a decision to renew the mandate of the working group tasked with improving the governance and financial situation of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and two texts endorsing the respective 2016-2017 resource projections for the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Fund and the Fund of the United Nations International Drug Control Programme.

By the terms of an oral decision adopted this morning, the Council also took note of a 2016 report of the International Narcotics Control Board on the precursors and chemicals frequently used in the illicit manufacture of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances.  By the terms of several other texts, the Council supported the implementation of the United Nations Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons; the provision of technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to counter-terrorism; and the practical application of the United Nations Standard Minimum Roles for the Treatment of Prisoners, known as the “Nelson Mandela Rules”.

Adopting a draft decision in response to a request by the Permanent Representative of Zimbabwe, the Council also decided to enlarge the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 101 to 102 States.

In addition, the Council adopted a resolution highlighting the centrality of science, technology and innovation in development — especially the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals — as well as one providing an assessment of the progress made in the implementation of and follow-up to the outcomes of the World Summit on Information.

Throughout the day, the Council also heard from the heads of several of its relevant subsidiary bodies, who outlined recent sessions and highlighted progress achieved.

Mitsuru Kitano (Japan), Chair of the twenty-sixth session of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Narcotic Drugs, described that body’s efforts to address issues ranging from terrorism to wildlife crime to violence against women.  Noting that the theme of the upcoming United Nations Crime Congress would be “Advancing Crime Prevention, Criminal Justice and the Rule of Law towards the Achievement of the 2030 Agenda”, he said the Commission’s work was closely related to Sustainable Development Goal 16 on peace, justice and strong institutions, Goal 4 on health and Goal 5 on gender equality, among others.

Bente Angell-Hansen (Norway), Chair of the sixtieth session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, detailed activities undertaken in line with its mandate — namely, to assist the Economic and Social Council in supervising the application of three global drug-related treaties.  The Commission was tackling a number of new issues, she said, citing the emergence of new psychoactive substances and “dark nets” and announcing its decision to add two precursors to the drug fentanyl to those substances banned under the United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances.

On human rights, Craig Mokhiber, Chief of the Development and Economic and Social Issues Branch of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights’ (OHCHR) Research and Right to Development Division described efforts to help States deliver on their commitments to comply with global human rights treaties.  Noting that a lack of available resources was no justification for non-compliance with such instruments, he went on to outline the recent work of several specialized human rights bodies, including the Committee on the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Ruijin Wang (China), Chair of the twentieth session of the Commission on Science and Technology for Development, briefed the Council on the highlights of that session, including a round table on the theme “eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions” and discussions on ways to harness new and emerging technologies to deliver on the Sustainable Development Goals.  Expressing concern about the widening digital divide — particularly for women, who were 31 per cent less likely to use the internet in least developed countries — participants had nevertheless cited rapid growth in broadband access and reaffirmed their commitment to increase access to science and technology for innovation, he said.

Other topics addressed today included review and coordination of the implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011-2020, sustainable development, international cooperation in tax matters and assistance to third States affected by the application of sanctions.

The Council will reconvene on Friday, 7 July, at 10 a.m. to continue its work.

Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and Narcotic Drugs

MITSURU KITANO (Japan), Chair of the twenty-sixth session of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Narcotic Drugs, presented the highlights of that session, saying the Commission worked on a wide range of issues including terrorism, trafficking in persons, wildlife crime and violence against women, providing policy guidelines on those and other issues.  During its twenty-sixth session, it had approved nine resolutions and four decisions, including several texts recommended to the Economic and Social Council and others that would eventually be forwarded to the General Assembly. 

Among those, he said, the Commission had adopted texts on such items as the United Nations Standard Minimum Rule on the Treatment of Prisoners — sometimes called the “Nelson Mandela Rule” — and on the provision of technical assistance for counter-terrorism.  Among other things, it had also decided that the overall theme of the upcoming Crime Congress would be “Advancing Crime Prevention, Criminal Justice and the Rule of Law towards the Achievement of the 2030 Agenda”. Pointing out, in that respect, that most of the work under Sustainable Development Goal 16 fell under the Commission’s purview, he added that its work was also related to Goal 5 on gender equality, Goal 4 on health and a number of other topics.

BENTE ANGELL-HANSEN (Norway), Chair of the sixtieth session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, then outlined that session, recalling that the Commission assisted the Council in supervising the application of three global drug-related treaties.  Describing several new issues being addressed by the Commission — including the emergence of new psychoactive substances and “dark nets” — she said that it had acted on 12 substances, including adding two precursors to the drug fentanyl to those prohibited under the United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances.  “This is about saving lives,” she said, underlining the grave dangers posed by that drug. 

Among other drafts adopted by the Commission was one aimed at improving the governance and financial situation of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), another meant to enhance the capacity of law enforcement and border control to counter illicit drug trafficking, one calling for intensified coordination and cooperation between United Nations entities and relevant domestic actors, and another outlining preparations for the Commission’s next session.  Noting that a Joint Ministerial segment would be held at that session to discuss the follow-up to the 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Session on the World Drug Problem, she also outlined several of the Commission’s ongoing technological efforts, such as the creation of an online “knowledge hub” for best practices.

Narcotic Drugs

VIROJ SUMYAI, President of the International Narcotics Control Board, presented its annual report for 2016 and its 2016 report on precursors and chemicals frequently used in the illicit manufacture of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances.  Launched in March 2017, the reports gave recommendations to the international community.  Such reports and technical publications complemented the work of national authorities towards ensuring adequate availability of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances for medical and scientific purposes.  They also provided detailed data on estimates of annual legitimate requirements of each country, as well as on the illicit production, manufacture, trade and consumption of drugs worldwide. 

Highlighting findings in the annual report’s chapter on women and drugs, he said that while women were one third of global drug users, they made up only one fifth of drug treatment recipients.  Women were increasingly being arrested for drug-related offences, which had a heavy impact on families, particularly children.  He highlighted several other sections of the report, including on international controlled drugs for medical and scientific purposes, the functioning of the international drug control system, and international cooperation in precursor control.  The report’s regional analysis of the world drug situation focused in greater detail on Afghanistan.  The report also discussed the regulation of the use of cannabis for non-medical purposes and State responses to drug-related offences, including the need to respect human rights.  The report’s closing chapter contained recommendations. 

In the general discussion that followed, the representative of the Russian Federation welcomed the Commission’s resolution 60/1 on preparations of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs.  To ensure success at the Commission’s sixty-second ministerial meeting in 2019, it would be important to focus current work on evaluating progress thus far in achieving specific targets and goals of the 2009 Political Declaration and Plan of Action on International Cooperation towards an Integrated and Balanced Strategy to Counter the World Drug Problem.

The representative of Mexico said it was crucial that the Council help build synergies with the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, stressing the need for greater complementarity of global, regional and national efforts.  Gender elements must be taken into consideration, he added, highlighting the specific needs of men and women in preventing crime.  It was also crucial to exchange information on best practices and technical assistance.  He called for the implementation of the outcome document of the 2016 Special Session on the World Drug Problem and highlighted the importance of strengthening the health, criminal justice and education sectors.  The Commission must continue to evaluate implementation of recommendations from the Special Session.

The Council then took action on a number of recommendations contained in the reports of those bodies.  Acting without a vote, it first adopted a draft decision contained in chapter 1, section A of the report of the reconvened twenty-fifth session of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (document E/2016/30/Add.1), by which it took note of that report.  It also adopted a similar draft resolution contained in chapter 1, section A of the Commission’s report on its twenty-sixth session (document E/2017/30).

In the same document, the Council adopted without a vote draft resolution 1, entitled “Follow-up to the Thirteenth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice and preparations for the Fourteenth United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice”; draft resolution 2, entitled “Promoting the practical application of the United Nations Standard Minimum Roles for the Treatment of Prisoners (the Nelson Mandela Rules)”; and draft resolution 3, entitled “Technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to counter-terrorism”, as orally corrected.

Turning to a number of texts contained in chapter 1, section B of the same document, it adopted without a vote draft resolution 1, entitled “Implementation of the United Nations Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons”, and draft resolution 2, entitled “Promoting and encouraging the implementation of alternatives to imprisonment as part of comprehensive prevention and criminal justice procedures”.

In chapter 1, section C of the document, it adopted without a vote draft decision 1, entitled “Improving the governance and financial situation of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime: extension of the mandate of the standing open-ended intergovernmental working group on improving the governance and financial situation of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime”; draft decision 2, entitled “Report of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice on its twenty-sixth session and provisional agenda for its twenty-seventh session”; and draft decision 3, entitled “Appointment of two members of the Board of Trustees of the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute”.  It also adopted without a vote an oral decision by which it took note of the report of the Board of Trustees on that body’s major activities (document E/2017/74).

By the terms of a draft decision contained in chapter 1, section A of the report of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs on its reconvened fifty-ninth session (document E/2016/28/Add.1) — also adopted without a vote — the Council took note of that report.

Turning to the Commission’s report on its sixtieth session (document E/2017/28), the Council adopted without a vote a draft resolution contained in chapter 1, section A, by which it recommended to the General Assembly the adoption of a draft resolution entitled “Promoting the implementation of the United Nations Guiding Principles on Alternative Development and related commitments on alternative development and regional, interregional and international cooperation on development-oriented, balanced drug control policy addressing socioeconomic issues”. 

Acting again without a vote, the Council adopted several draft decisions contained in chapter 1, section B of the same report, including draft decision 1, entitled “Preparations for the sixty-second session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs in 2019”; draft decision 3, entitled “Report of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs on its sixtieth session and provisional agenda for its sixty-first session”; and draft decision 4, by which it took note of the report of the International Narcotics Control Board for 2016 (document E/INCB/2017/1).

Also without a vote, it adopted an oral decision by which it took note of Board’s 2016 report on the precursors and chemicals frequently used in the illicit manufacture of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances (document E/INCB/2017/4).

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

GRAINNE O’HARA, Deputy Director of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in New York, presented an oral report on the coordination aspects of the Office’s activities.  Over the past year, the number of people displaced by conflict, war and persecution had reached 65.6 million, including 22.5 million refugees.  While the conflict in Syria remained the largest source of refugees, the current crisis in South Sudan was resulting in the outflow of some 1.9 million refugees.  Partnership with a broad range of actors was fundamental for addressing the challenges faced by refugees and internally displaced persons.  In 2016, UNHCR collaborated with more than 900 partners, to which it channelled some $1.44 billion.  In 2016, several key events influenced its work, including the World Humanitarian Summit and the adoption of the New York Declaration on Refugees and Migrants.  The latter marked a unique milestone for global solidarity and refugee protection. 

UNHCR had also strengthened its work with various development actors, including the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the World Bank, she said.  With the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), a new Coalition on Every Child’s Right to a Nationality had been launched.  She also spotlighted the fruitful partnership with non-governmental organizations and the need to strengthen coordination with the private sector.  Innovation and entrepreneurship could benefit refugees, she added. 

Acting without vote, the Council then adopted a draft decision titled “Enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees” (document E/2017/L.13), by which it took note of the request in a 7 February 2017 note verbale from the Permanent Representative of Zimbabwe to the United Nations (document E/2017/47) to enlarge the Executive Committee’s membership and recommended that the General Assembly, at its seventy-second session, decide on the question of enlarging the membership from 101 to 102 States.

Human Rights

CRAIG MOKHIBER, Chief, Development and Economic and Social Issues Branch, Research and Right to Development Division, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), presented three human rights-focused reports: the report of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on economic, social and cultural rights (document E/2017/70); the report of the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on its 2016 sessions (document E/2017/22); and the biennial report of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (document A/72/55).  He noted that implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and economic, social and cultural rights as well as other human rights had placed great demands on public budgets.  As a matter of law, States could not simply invoke a lack of available resources to justify non-compliance with the human rights treaties that they had ratified.  States must ensure that policy choices prioritize the implementation of all human rights, he stressed, adding that expansion of available resources could be advanced by combating corruption.

The report also highlighted key elements to ensure that States delivered on their commitments, namely with a transparent public decision-making process, full access to information and meaningful public participation, he continued.  To achieve that, it would be necessary to strengthen the capacity of public officials, civil society, and human rights institutions and monitor public budgets from a human rights perspective.  He also noted several recent highlights of the work of the Committee on the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and introduced the biennial report of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2015-2016).  The latter report included the Committee’s events, its adopted guidelines on periodic reporting, and its push to promote accessibility across the organization.

The Council then took note of all three human-rights-focused reports.

Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

MARIAM WALLET ABOUBAKRINE (Mali), Chair of the sixteenth session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, said indigenous peoples were gaining visibility and importance across the United Nations system in light of the Paris Agreement on climate change and the 2030 Agenda, among other recent frameworks.  Outlining the Permanent Forum’s recent sixteenth session — which she said had been attended by a large number of Member States, over 1,000 indigenous representatives and many non-governmental organizations and United Nations agencies, funds and programmes — she recalled that its main theme had been the “Tenth Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”.  Participants had reviewed some of the achievements and remaining challenges in implementing the Declaration, which established a universal framework of minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the world’s indigenous peoples and elaborated on other relevant human rights standards and fundamental freedoms.

Spotlighting some achievements identified by the Permanent Forum, she cited the recognition of indigenous peoples by some constitutional and legal frameworks and the inclusion of targeted policies and programmes.  Nevertheless, the Permanent Forum was concerned about the gap between that formal recognition and implementation in practice.  Among other things, the body had also welcomed progress in the implementation of the United Nations system-wide action plan on the rights of indigenous peoples and discussed the situation of indigenous human rights defenders, the 2030 Agenda’s implications for indigenous peoples and the empowerment of indigenous women and youth.  As a subsidiary body of the Economic and Social Council, the Permanent Forum had also deepened its engagement with the Council’s other bodies — including the Commission on the Status of Women — and contributed a substantive input to the upcoming high-level political forum on sustainable development. 

As the Council began its general discussion of that item, the representative of the United States recalled that his Government had facilitated a visit of the Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Issues earlier this year, and would follow up on her recommendations.  Reiterating his delegation’s commitment to the principles enshrined in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, he stressed that the United States would be reluctant to see the development of a system that undermined those principles.  While there was an ongoing discussion on how to define indigenous peoples, he emphasized that “indigenous identity is not exclusively defined by European colonization”.  Underlining the relevance of the Sustainable Development Goals to indigenous peoples, he described the United States efforts to collect disaggregated data on American Indians, Alaskan Natives and Hawaiian/Pacific natives, and outlined its various policies on indigenous health, the empowerment of indigenous women and youth and the preservation of indigenous languages. 

The representative of Mexico, also speaking on behalf of Guatemala, cited a “notable improvement” in the spirit of dialogue on indigenous issues over the period under review.  Making a number of relevant proposals, he called for a special category to be established for representatives of indigenous peoples, as they were not non-governmental organizations; the creation of modalities of participation that did not fall below the threshold currently allowed for non-governmental organizations; and the establishment of a forum for the discussion on indigenous issues, with representation from all regions of the world.

The representative of Australia, also speaking on behalf of Canada, recalled that participants at the 2014 World Conference on Indigenous Peoples had committed to enhance their participation in international meetings that affected them.  The General Assembly, in resolution 70/232, had initiated a process to draft a resolution on those issues, which had now been under discussion for 12 months.  Expressing regret that the Assembly’s discussions had moved away from their original purpose, he urged the United Nations to give consideration to the broader participation of indigenous peoples.

The Council then turned to chapter 1, section A of the report of the Permanent Forum of its sixteenth session (document E/2017/43), which contained three draft decisions, titled: “International expert group meeting on the theme ‘Sustainable development in the territories of indigenous people’”; “Venue and dates for the seventeenth session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues”; and “Report of the Permanent Forum on the Indigenous Issues on its sixteenth session and provisional agenda for its seventeenth session”.  The Council adopted all three draft decisions without a vote.

Comprehensive Implementation of Durban Declaration and Programme of Action

The Council then took up that topic, for which there was no documentation or draft proposal.

Implementation of Programme of Action for Least Developed Countries 2011-2020

FEKITAMOELOA KATOA ‘UTOIKAMANU, Under-Secretary-General and High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States, introduced the report of the Secretary-General on Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011-2020 (document E/2017/60), saying it provided an overview of recent progress made as a result of the efforts of least developed countries and their development partners.  Much remained to be done, however, as not all countries had fully shared in the development progress made in recent years.  While the average growth rate of the world’s least developed countries had risen, it remained far below the 7 per cent target laid out in the Istanbul Programme of Action.

Citing the disproportionate impact on those countries of natural disasters and economic shocks, she said the report highlighted the need for economic diversification and efforts to drive up industrial production and investment.  Recalling the General Assembly’s recent decision to set up the Technology Bank for the Least Developed Countries, she said the report also provided evidence of the need to build their scientific and technological base.  Agriculture remained the sector with the highest share of employment in those countries, she said, adding that the share of the world’s exports originating in them had fallen.  More efforts were also needed in the area of human resources capacity development as gender disparities at the secondary and tertiary education levels persisted.  Additionally, the data revealed a need to scale up climate financing for adaptation in the least developed countries and to address remaining challenges in the areas of governance, transparency and counter-corruption.

Sustainable Development

KEITH NURSE, Rapporteur of the Commission for Development Policy, introduced the report of the nineteenth session of the Committee for Development Policy (document E/2017/33), which examines several sustainable development issues relevant to the Council’s deliberations.  The Committee addressed several themes, including lessons learned from developing productive capabilities, issues relating to least developed countries, and total official support for sustainable development.  The Committee also reviewed the development progress of Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Vanuatu and Samoa, he said, underscoring the development opportunities and challenges faced by those nations.  He noted various recommendations and conclusions outlined in the report, relating mostly to least developed countries, their track to graduate from that status, and the challenges they faced. 

While benefits extended on a case-by-case basis were helpful for least developed countries, such ad-hoc policies would create difficulties and uncertainty to the graduating and graduated countries when they formulated medium and long-term transition strategy, he said.  Additional efforts were needed to reduce existing differences in the least developed countries category application and improve the overall application coherence.  He said the Committee was developing a web-based graduation toolkit, which would help countries map out and assess the type of specific support currently used and available.

The representative of Bangladesh said the report provided updates on many issues facing least developed countries and had clearly shown that more concrete and targeted support was required from the international community.  It showed that poverty was pervasive and that “business-as-usual” would keep most people in least developed countries poor.  “Our countries are still suffering from the world economic and financial crises of 2008,” she said.  Climate change, disease outbreaks and conflict had devastating impacts on least developed countries, she continued, expressing concern that official development assistance (ODA) had further decreased in recent years, as had the share of exports from least developed countries.  Technology and investment were key drivers of structural development in those countries, she said, calling on development partners to reverse declining ODA.

The Council then turned to draft resolution titled “Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011-2010” (document E/2017/L.25).

The representative of Ecuador, introducing that text on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, noted that it contained some contemporary elements that were critical to the Group.  Among other things, it would have the Council express concern over the recent declines in ODA and foreign direct investment (FDI) and invite the Council President to convene a full session on those issues at its next financing for development follow-up meeting.  It would also have the Council call on donors to contribute to the full operationalization of the Technology Bank for Least Developed Countries, he said.

The Council then postponed its consideration of that draft until its 25-26 July coordination and management meeting.

Science and Technology for Development

RUIJIN WANG (China), Chair of the twentieth session of the Commission on Science and Technology for Development, introduced a report on that session (document E/2017/31), describing the session’s contributions to the Council’s high-level segment and a round table on the theme “eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions”.  At that event, he said, there had been universal agreement that science and technology for innovation played an integral role in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.  Participants had highlighted the need to harness new and emerging technologies, as well as to support national innovation systems to deliver on the Goals.  In addition, they had welcomed the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development’s (UNCTAD) various reviews on the integration of science and technology for innovation in national policies.  Technology transfer on mutually-agreed terms and conditions had also been highlighted, as had the need to consolidate best practices, success stories and knowledge in order to support developing countries.

Participants had cited rapid growth in broadband access and reaffirmed their commitment to increase access to science and technology for innovation, especially the Internet, he continued.  They had noted with concern the widening of the digital divide, particularly for women, who were 31 per cent less likely to use the internet in least developed countries.  Participants had welcomed the new “e-trade for all” initiative and discussed the need for Governments to take into account the needs of poor and marginalized communities as well as grass-roots groups.  Noting with great concern that every ninth person around the world was undernourished, participants had discussed new and emerging technologies that could help reverse that trend, while States had shared their national experience with using science and technology for innovation to promote growth and development.

DONG WU, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), introduced the report of the Secretary-General on progress made in the implementation of and follow-up to the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society at the regional and international levels (document A/72/64-E/2017/12).  She focused on three main issues, namely key trends on access and use, recent trends in technology and services, and developments in internet governance.  Half of the world’s people used the internet in 2016, a significant increase from 2005.  Some 60 per cent of the global population subscribed to mobile services.  Such findings varied greatly by geography, however, she said, noting also a widening gender divide.  Other barriers included difficult geographical environments, lack of complementary infrastructure, and weakness in legal and regulatory frameworks.

Social media was becoming the main source of news for a growing number of people, she said.  Substantial investments in developing robotics and artificial intelligence and advances in those fields would likely transform trade and jobs.  That would pose an immense challenge to Government institutions.  Some countries were better equipped than others to benefit from e-commerce.  The report concluded that information and communications technology had become increasingly critical to economic development.  International cooperation was essential to tackling digital divides, she added. 

The representative of China welcomed the progress made in coming up with various ways to incorporate science and technology into national development agendas.  China would continue to host seminars on science and technology for developing countries, as well as welcome their young scientists.  Training programmes in the field were essential for development.  Innovation must play a crucial role in delivering on the 2030 Agenda, he said.

The Council then turned to the report of the Commission on Science and Technology for Development on its twentieth session (document E/2017/31).  Chapter 1, section A of that report contained two draft resolutions, titled: “Assessment of the progress made in the implementation of and follow-up to the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society” and “Science, technology and innovation for development”.  The Council adopted both the texts without a vote.

Turning to chapter 1, section B of the same report, the Council adopted, without a vote, a draft decision titled “Report of the Commission on Science and Technology for Development on its twentieth session and provisional agenda and documentation for the twenty-first session of the Commission”.

International Cooperation in Tax Matters

The Council took action on the recommendation contained in the report of the Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax matters on its fourteenth session (document E/2017/45).  Turning to chapter IV of the report, the Council adopted a draft decision titled “Venue and dates of and provisional agenda for the fifteenth session of the Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters”.  The Council also took note of the report of its fourteenth session.

Assistance to Third States Affected by the Application of Sanctions

The Council then took up that topic, for which there was no documentation or draft proposal.

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